2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153548
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Creating the Environment for Evidence-Based Nursing Practice
Abstract:
Creating the Environment for Evidence-Based Nursing Practice
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 21, 2004
Author:Moorhead, Sue Ann, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Associate Professor
Nursing administrators and managers have long dreamed of being able to report in meaningful terms the quality of care delivered by nurses in their institutions and agencies. This dream has been elusive, as much of what nursing does remains invisible to the public, policy makers, other disciplines, and nurses themselves. Today the use of standardized languages in clinical practice has made it possible to describe more than medication errors, incidence of falls, and infection rates in hospitals as outcomes of care. The use of the NANDA International Nursing Diagnoses, the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC), and the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) has made it possible to describe the outcomes of treatments provided by nurses. Focus: This paper will provide useful strategies to implement evidence-based practice in clinical settings. Practical strategies for unit based approaches will be outlined as well as suggested variables and sources of these data. Examples of changes in outcome ratings for patients in response to nursing interventions for specific nursing diagnoses will be shared. These data have been collected as part of a large study focused on testing the outcome measurement scales of the NOC across 10 test sites in the Midwestern region of the U.S. The sites include long-term care, community and tertiary hospitals, a nursing center, community health clinics, visiting nurses, and parish nursing. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the areas in which nurses are making a difference in improving patient outcomes or maintaining functioning at the highest level possible. Nurse administrators and managers who have these data are better equipped to make decisions that impact quality of care for the clients they serve. Fulfilling the dream of being able to share the outcomes of care achieved by nurses in their agencies and institutions becomes possible and builds a solid base for evidence-based practice
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCreating the Environment for Evidence-Based Nursing Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153548-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Creating the Environment for Evidence-Based Nursing Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 21, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moorhead, Sue Ann, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smoorhead3@mchsi.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nursing administrators and managers have long dreamed of being able to report in meaningful terms the quality of care delivered by nurses in their institutions and agencies. This dream has been elusive, as much of what nursing does remains invisible to the public, policy makers, other disciplines, and nurses themselves. Today the use of standardized languages in clinical practice has made it possible to describe more than medication errors, incidence of falls, and infection rates in hospitals as outcomes of care. The use of the NANDA International Nursing Diagnoses, the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC), and the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) has made it possible to describe the outcomes of treatments provided by nurses. Focus: This paper will provide useful strategies to implement evidence-based practice in clinical settings. Practical strategies for unit based approaches will be outlined as well as suggested variables and sources of these data. Examples of changes in outcome ratings for patients in response to nursing interventions for specific nursing diagnoses will be shared. These data have been collected as part of a large study focused on testing the outcome measurement scales of the NOC across 10 test sites in the Midwestern region of the U.S. The sites include long-term care, community and tertiary hospitals, a nursing center, community health clinics, visiting nurses, and parish nursing. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the areas in which nurses are making a difference in improving patient outcomes or maintaining functioning at the highest level possible. Nurse administrators and managers who have these data are better equipped to make decisions that impact quality of care for the clients they serve. Fulfilling the dream of being able to share the outcomes of care achieved by nurses in their agencies and institutions becomes possible and builds a solid base for evidence-based practice</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:20:52Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-21en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:20:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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