2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153553
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learning from Experience: UK Perspectives on Translation Research
Abstract:
Learning from Experience: UK Perspectives on Translation Research
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 21, 2004
Author:Rycroft-Malone, Joanne, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Royal College of Nursing Institute
Title:Senior Research Fellow
Objective: Evidence-based practice has emerged as the dominant theme of practice, policy, management and education within the United Kingdom’s (UK) National Health Service (NHS). Policy frameworks typically indicate that the implementation of evidence into practice follows a logical and rational model from production, to dissemination and then implementation, audit and improvement. However, examples and experience from practice suggest that getting evidence into practice is a messy and complex process which cannot be explained by simplistic processes. This paper will outline some examples from UK based translation research and consider the implications they have for the advancement of translation science. Approach: Findings from UK projects such as the Promoting Action on Clinical Effectiveness (PACE) programme (Dopson et al 1999) and the South Thames Evidence-based Practice Project (STEP) (Redfurn et al 2000), have been reviewed. From this analysis a number of main themes emerge as influential in the uptake of evidence into practice. Findings: Key findings include ‘evidence’ is socially and historically constructed, change does not follow a prescribed or logical path, context can be a potent mediator and individuals and groups have significant roles to play in both facilitating and inhibiting implementation efforts. Conclusions: Based on these findings a number of suggestions can be made for translation science, including the need to particularise and situate evidence, that improving practice is likely to mean drawing on different forms of information and knowledge to ascertain evidence of what works, approaches and interventions that work with, and develop the context, may be more successful than those that ignore it, and, there is a need to pay more attention to the social and human aspects of getting evidence into practice. Implications: The implications these conclusions have for research and practice will be considered as part of this presentation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLearning from Experience: UK Perspectives on Translation Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153553-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Learning from Experience: UK Perspectives on Translation Research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 21, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rycroft-Malone, Joanne, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Royal College of Nursing Institute</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior Research Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">joanne.rycroft-malone@rcn.org.uk</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Evidence-based practice has emerged as the dominant theme of practice, policy, management and education within the United Kingdom&rsquo;s (UK) National Health Service (NHS). Policy frameworks typically indicate that the implementation of evidence into practice follows a logical and rational model from production, to dissemination and then implementation, audit and improvement. However, examples and experience from practice suggest that getting evidence into practice is a messy and complex process which cannot be explained by simplistic processes. This paper will outline some examples from UK based translation research and consider the implications they have for the advancement of translation science. Approach: Findings from UK projects such as the Promoting Action on Clinical Effectiveness (PACE) programme (Dopson et al 1999) and the South Thames Evidence-based Practice Project (STEP) (Redfurn et al 2000), have been reviewed. From this analysis a number of main themes emerge as influential in the uptake of evidence into practice. Findings: Key findings include &lsquo;evidence&rsquo; is socially and historically constructed, change does not follow a prescribed or logical path, context can be a potent mediator and individuals and groups have significant roles to play in both facilitating and inhibiting implementation efforts. Conclusions: Based on these findings a number of suggestions can be made for translation science, including the need to particularise and situate evidence, that improving practice is likely to mean drawing on different forms of information and knowledge to ascertain evidence of what works, approaches and interventions that work with, and develop the context, may be more successful than those that ignore it, and, there is a need to pay more attention to the social and human aspects of getting evidence into practice. Implications: The implications these conclusions have for research and practice will be considered as part of this presentation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:21:05Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-21en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:21:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.