2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153555
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Education: Critical Thinking in an Online World
Abstract:
Nursing Education: Critical Thinking in an Online World
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 21, 2004
Author:Schafer, Patricia A., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Title:Clinical and Online Faculty
This study compared critical thinking abilities of senior baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a gerontology course. Students (N = 50) in group A (n = 29) completed the course in the traditional classroom setting while students in group B (n = 21) completed the course online. The method included quantitative and qualitative measures. Critical thinking abilities within the classroom were based on theoretical concepts and measured with testing items related to areas of the nursing process. Significance between groups was reported using the two-tailed t-test. Group B, online students, demonstrated significantly higher scores in the areas of assessment of clients and planning patient care than group A, traditional classroom students. In the clinical setting, the Holistic Critical Thinking Scoring Rubric was used to assign (HCTSR) a level to each student (B group n = 9; A group n = 10) for comparison of clinical critical thinking skills between the groups (N = 19). The Holistic Critical Thinking Scoring Rubric (HCTSR) was used in the clinical setting where results indicated group B students obtained higher overall levels of critical thinking than students in group A. In addition, students offered their perceptions of what they believed critical thinking meant and how they used critical thinking skills to meet course objectives during the clinical rotation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Education: Critical Thinking in an Online Worlden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153555-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Education: Critical Thinking in an Online World</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 21, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schafer, Patricia A., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical and Online Faculty</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">patricias@aristotle.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study compared critical thinking abilities of senior baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a gerontology course. Students (N = 50) in group A (n = 29) completed the course in the traditional classroom setting while students in group B (n = 21) completed the course online. The method included quantitative and qualitative measures. Critical thinking abilities within the classroom were based on theoretical concepts and measured with testing items related to areas of the nursing process. Significance between groups was reported using the two-tailed t-test. Group B, online students, demonstrated significantly higher scores in the areas of assessment of clients and planning patient care than group A, traditional classroom students. In the clinical setting, the Holistic Critical Thinking Scoring Rubric was used to assign (HCTSR) a level to each student (B group n = 9; A group n = 10) for comparison of clinical critical thinking skills between the groups (N = 19). The Holistic Critical Thinking Scoring Rubric (HCTSR) was used in the clinical setting where results indicated group B students obtained higher overall levels of critical thinking than students in group A. In addition, students offered their perceptions of what they believed critical thinking meant and how they used critical thinking skills to meet course objectives during the clinical rotation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:21:10Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-21en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:21:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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