Implementation of Individualized Music by Trained Staff and Family to Reduce Agitation in Persons with Dementia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153565
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementation of Individualized Music by Trained Staff and Family to Reduce Agitation in Persons with Dementia
Abstract:
Implementation of Individualized Music by Trained Staff and Family to Reduce Agitation in Persons with Dementia
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 9, 2003
Author:Gerdner, Linda A., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:assistant professor
Purpose: This pilot study used a mixed methodology to evaluate the feasibility of individualized music as an alternative intervention in the management of agitation when implemented by trained staff and family members. Methods: The sample consisted of 8 persons with dementia who resided in a long-term care facility. The quantitative component involved a pre-experimental repeated measures pre-test/post test design. Nursing staff and family members of enrolled residents were trained in the use of individualized music. During the subsequent 8 weeks, certified nursing assistants (CNAs) administered individualized music for 30 minutes at an individually prescribed time and "as needed". Family members were encouraged to play music during their visits. The Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI) measured the overall weekly agitation level on day and evening shifts. The Agitation Visual Analog Scale (VAS) measured the degree of agitation immediately before and after the intervention. The qualitative component of this study consisted of a series of open ended interviews to query staff and family regarding the resident’s response to music and the barriers and facilitators to implementation. Results: Compliance rate of intervention was 97.8%. ANOVA for a mixed effects repeated measures model showed a significant reduction in agitation (p<0.0001) during the immediate intervention period throughout the 8-week interval. A significant reduction in overall agitation was noted on day shift during weeks 1-8 (p<0.0001) and on evening shift during weeks 5-8 (p=0.027). The overwhelming majority of staff and family reported a decrease in agitated behaviors during the implementation of music, providing convergent validity to quantitative findings. In addition, the music served as a catalyst to promote meaningful interaction between the resident and others. The resident's positive response served as a facilitator for the implementation of music.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
9-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementation of Individualized Music by Trained Staff and Family to Reduce Agitation in Persons with Dementiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153565-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Implementation of Individualized Music by Trained Staff and Family to Reduce Agitation in Persons with Dementia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 9, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gerdner, Linda A., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">assistant professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gerdn001@umn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This pilot study used a mixed methodology to evaluate the feasibility of individualized music as an alternative intervention in the management of agitation when implemented by trained staff and family members. Methods: The sample consisted of 8 persons with dementia who resided in a long-term care facility. The quantitative component involved a pre-experimental repeated measures pre-test/post test design. Nursing staff and family members of enrolled residents were trained in the use of individualized music. During the subsequent 8 weeks, certified nursing assistants (CNAs) administered individualized music for 30 minutes at an individually prescribed time and &quot;as needed&quot;. Family members were encouraged to play music during their visits. The Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI) measured the overall weekly agitation level on day and evening shifts. The Agitation Visual Analog Scale (VAS) measured the degree of agitation immediately before and after the intervention. The qualitative component of this study consisted of a series of open ended interviews to query staff and family regarding the resident&rsquo;s response to music and the barriers and facilitators to implementation. Results: Compliance rate of intervention was 97.8%. ANOVA for a mixed effects repeated measures model showed a significant reduction in agitation (p&lt;0.0001) during the immediate intervention period throughout the 8-week interval. A significant reduction in overall agitation was noted on day shift during weeks 1-8 (p&lt;0.0001) and on evening shift during weeks 5-8 (p=0.027). The overwhelming majority of staff and family reported a decrease in agitated behaviors during the implementation of music, providing convergent validity to quantitative findings. In addition, the music served as a catalyst to promote meaningful interaction between the resident and others. The resident's positive response served as a facilitator for the implementation of music.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:21:36Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-09en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:21:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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