2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153567
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evidence-Based Practice: Acute-Care Management of HIV-Related Fever
Abstract:
Evidence-Based Practice: Acute-Care Management of HIV-Related Fever
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 9, 2003
Author:Jones, Sande Gracia, PhD, ARNP, ACRN, C, CS, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Florida International University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: Although fever is a common symptom in HIV/AIDS, controversy exists as to the best way to manage fever (Holtzclaw, 1995). Nursing studies were conducted to determine the goal of nursing care in management of HIV-related fever in hospitalized patients, and the fever intervention that would best meet this goal. Design: Descriptive exploratory Population, Sample, Setting, Years: HIV/AIDS patients at a South Florida hospital, 1994-1999 Methods: After IRB approval, medical records of 100 HIV+ inpatients were reviewed to determine incidence and characteristics of body temperature elevation. Grossman and Keen’s (1995) Fever Questionnaire was used to determine goals of nursing care and current nursing practice for HIV/AIDS fever management. A qualitative study was conducted to discover patients’ perspective of the HIV fever experience. Study findings were used to design an intervention study. Ten patients, serving as their own control, evaluated three different interventions for fever care: antipyretic administration alone (oral acetaminophen 650 mg) versus antipyretic administration combined with a physical cooling method (cool compresses to the forehead versus a “cooling scarf” to the neck). Findings: Episodes of temperature elevation occurred frequently in this sample. Unlike fever typically seen in medical-surgical patients, episodes were irregular, self-limiting, and not accompanied by an elevated WBC. Patients perceived fever as discomfort and “the hot and cold”. Goals of nursing care were to decrease body temperature while simultaneously increasing patient comfort (Jones, 1998). The intervention of antipyretic administration combined with a “cooling scarf” was the most effective intervention to meet these goals (Jones, 1999). Conclusion: Based on the evidence from study findings for this particular sample, nursing standards of practice at the hospital were revised to reflect study findings. Implications: Further study is recommended to determine whether antipyretic administration plus a “cooling scarf” is an effective fever care intervention for other groups of hospital patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
9-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvidence-Based Practice: Acute-Care Management of HIV-Related Feveren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153567-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evidence-Based Practice: Acute-Care Management of HIV-Related Fever</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 9, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jones, Sande Gracia, PhD, ARNP, ACRN, C, CS, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Florida International University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">joness@fiu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Although fever is a common symptom in HIV/AIDS, controversy exists as to the best way to manage fever (Holtzclaw, 1995). Nursing studies were conducted to determine the goal of nursing care in management of HIV-related fever in hospitalized patients, and the fever intervention that would best meet this goal. Design: Descriptive exploratory Population, Sample, Setting, Years: HIV/AIDS patients at a South Florida hospital, 1994-1999 Methods: After IRB approval, medical records of 100 HIV+ inpatients were reviewed to determine incidence and characteristics of body temperature elevation. Grossman and Keen&rsquo;s (1995) Fever Questionnaire was used to determine goals of nursing care and current nursing practice for HIV/AIDS fever management. A qualitative study was conducted to discover patients&rsquo; perspective of the HIV fever experience. Study findings were used to design an intervention study. Ten patients, serving as their own control, evaluated three different interventions for fever care: antipyretic administration alone (oral acetaminophen 650 mg) versus antipyretic administration combined with a physical cooling method (cool compresses to the forehead versus a &ldquo;cooling scarf&rdquo; to the neck). Findings: Episodes of temperature elevation occurred frequently in this sample. Unlike fever typically seen in medical-surgical patients, episodes were irregular, self-limiting, and not accompanied by an elevated WBC. Patients perceived fever as discomfort and &ldquo;the hot and cold&rdquo;. Goals of nursing care were to decrease body temperature while simultaneously increasing patient comfort (Jones, 1998). The intervention of antipyretic administration combined with a &ldquo;cooling scarf&rdquo; was the most effective intervention to meet these goals (Jones, 1999). Conclusion: Based on the evidence from study findings for this particular sample, nursing standards of practice at the hospital were revised to reflect study findings. Implications: Further study is recommended to determine whether antipyretic administration plus a &ldquo;cooling scarf&rdquo; is an effective fever care intervention for other groups of hospital patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:21:40Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-09en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:21:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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