Early Risk Indicators and Pattern Manifestations of Substance Abuse Impairment in Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153574
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Early Risk Indicators and Pattern Manifestations of Substance Abuse Impairment in Nurses
Abstract:
Early Risk Indicators and Pattern Manifestations of Substance Abuse Impairment in Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:West, Margaret Mary, DNSc, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Thomas Jefferson University
Title:Associate Professor, Site Coordinator
Substance abuse impairment in nursing is a problem affecting both the profession and society. Many impaired nurses are not identified until symptoms are very apparent and patients are at risk. The purposes of this study were to investigate early risk factors that lead to impairment, and to predict group membership between impaired (SI) and non-impaired (NSI) nurses. The theoretical framework was a synthesis of Donovan's multifactorial model of impairment (Donovan, 1986), and Rogers' (1970, 1992) Science of Unitary Human Beings. Data was gathered from 100 previously impaired (SI) and 100 non-impaired nurses (NSI). Questionnaires were used: Zuckerman Sensation Seeking Scale (SSS), the Efinger Alcohol Risk Survey (EARS), & the Children of Alcoholics Screening Test (CAST). Pearson's correlations demonstrated a significant relationship between scores on the EARS and SSS (r = .37, p = .01), and the EARS and CAST (r = .51, p = .01) for the SI nurses. For the NSI nurses, Pearson's correlations demonstrated a significant relationship only between scores on the EARS and CAST instruments (r = .31, p = .01). Independent t-test scores demonstrated the groups differed significantly on all three of the total scores (SSS: t = 8.30, df = 181.6, p = .001) (EARS: t = 18.71, df = 182.1, p = .001) (CAST: t = 7.91, df = 185.7, p = .001). Discriminant analysis indicated a correct prediction of 87% for SI membership and 95% for NSI membership, with an overall rate of 91%. EARS scores had the strongest correlation (.99) and was the best predictor of group membership scores. The results indicated that the three variables can be used to identify early risk factors for impairment. Early identification will allow for earlier intervention and possible prevention. Methods to reduce the number of modifiable risk factors are recommended.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEarly Risk Indicators and Pattern Manifestations of Substance Abuse Impairment in Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153574-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Early Risk Indicators and Pattern Manifestations of Substance Abuse Impairment in Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">West, Margaret Mary, DNSc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Thomas Jefferson University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor, Site Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Margaret.West@jefferson.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Substance abuse impairment in nursing is a problem affecting both the profession and society. Many impaired nurses are not identified until symptoms are very apparent and patients are at risk. The purposes of this study were to investigate early risk factors that lead to impairment, and to predict group membership between impaired (SI) and non-impaired (NSI) nurses. The theoretical framework was a synthesis of Donovan's multifactorial model of impairment (Donovan, 1986), and Rogers' (1970, 1992) Science of Unitary Human Beings. Data was gathered from 100 previously impaired (SI) and 100 non-impaired nurses (NSI). Questionnaires were used: Zuckerman Sensation Seeking Scale (SSS), the Efinger Alcohol Risk Survey (EARS), &amp; the Children of Alcoholics Screening Test (CAST). Pearson's correlations demonstrated a significant relationship between scores on the EARS and SSS (r = .37, p = .01), and the EARS and CAST (r = .51, p = .01) for the SI nurses. For the NSI nurses, Pearson's correlations demonstrated a significant relationship only between scores on the EARS and CAST instruments (r = .31, p = .01). Independent t-test scores demonstrated the groups differed significantly on all three of the total scores (SSS: t = 8.30, df = 181.6, p = .001) (EARS: t = 18.71, df = 182.1, p = .001) (CAST: t = 7.91, df = 185.7, p = .001). Discriminant analysis indicated a correct prediction of 87% for SI membership and 95% for NSI membership, with an overall rate of 91%. EARS scores had the strongest correlation (.99) and was the best predictor of group membership scores. The results indicated that the three variables can be used to identify early risk factors for impairment. Early identification will allow for earlier intervention and possible prevention. Methods to reduce the number of modifiable risk factors are recommended.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:21:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:21:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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