Frequency of Physical Examination Techniques Performed: Does Education Make a Difference

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153580
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Frequency of Physical Examination Techniques Performed: Does Education Make a Difference
Abstract:
Frequency of Physical Examination Techniques Performed: Does Education Make a Difference
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Giddens, Jean Foret, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico
Rapid changes in health care have underscored the need for reform in health professions education; nursing education is no exception. One of many problems cited in the literature is over-crowded curricula, thus an evaluation of content is necessary. The purpose of this study was to determine if differences exist in the frequency of physical examination techniques performed by associate- and baccalaureate- prepared nurses. The sample for this study (N=96) was a subset of 193 randomly surveyed registered nurses employed in direct patient care roles (in both inpatient and outpatient settings) at a large university-based heath care facility in the Southwest who worked at least 20 hours a week. From the larger sample, 48 participants with a bachelor of science degree in nursing (BSN) were matched with 48 participants with an associate degree in nursing (ADN) by clinical area and years of experience to control for differences between the two groups. Data were collected using a 124-item survey of physical examination techniques; participants indicated the average frequency they performed the techniques. The sample represented the following practice categories: adult, pediatric, perioperative, and maternal-infant. The number of years in clinical practice ranged from 0 to 24, with a mean of 10.8 (SD = 6.72) years. A Mann-Whitney test showed no differences in frequency of assessment categories performed by nurses representing these two groups. A small negative correlation was found between frequency and years of experience with the nutrition assessment category (rho = -.298, p = .003). The fact that no differences were found between BSN and ADN nurses has important implications for nursing education as curricular revisions are considered.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFrequency of Physical Examination Techniques Performed: Does Education Make a Differenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153580-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Frequency of Physical Examination Techniques Performed: Does Education Make a Difference</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Giddens, Jean Foret, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jgiddens@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Rapid changes in health care have underscored the need for reform in health professions education; nursing education is no exception. One of many problems cited in the literature is over-crowded curricula, thus an evaluation of content is necessary. The purpose of this study was to determine if differences exist in the frequency of physical examination techniques performed by associate- and baccalaureate- prepared nurses. The sample for this study (N=96) was a subset of 193 randomly surveyed registered nurses employed in direct patient care roles (in both inpatient and outpatient settings) at a large university-based heath care facility in the Southwest who worked at least 20 hours a week. From the larger sample, 48 participants with a bachelor of science degree in nursing (BSN) were matched with 48 participants with an associate degree in nursing (ADN) by clinical area and years of experience to control for differences between the two groups. Data were collected using a 124-item survey of physical examination techniques; participants indicated the average frequency they performed the techniques. The sample represented the following practice categories: adult, pediatric, perioperative, and maternal-infant. The number of years in clinical practice ranged from 0 to 24, with a mean of 10.8 (SD = 6.72) years. A Mann-Whitney test showed no differences in frequency of assessment categories performed by nurses representing these two groups. A small negative correlation was found between frequency and years of experience with the nutrition assessment category (rho = -.298, p = .003). The fact that no differences were found between BSN and ADN nurses has important implications for nursing education as curricular revisions are considered.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:22:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:22:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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