2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153584
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Minority Elders Staying in Control of Multiple Chronic Conditions
Abstract:
Minority Elders Staying in Control of Multiple Chronic Conditions
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Loeb, Susan J., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The Pennsylvania State University
Title:Assistant Professor of Nursing
Purpose: Uncover how community-dwelling minority elders with comorbidity minimize the negative consequences of their chronic conditions Specific Aims: 1) To identify proactive strategies used by minority elders to cope daily with comorbidity. 2) To uncover how significant others impact minority elders' success in chronic illness management. Methods: This study was conducted using focus group methodology to explore the strategies employed by minority elders (n=29) to manage multiple chronic health conditions. Inclusion criteria were: age > 55; ethnic/racial minority; community dwelling; and have > 2 chronic conditions. Five focus groups were conducted and saturation was achieved. The moderator used a semi-structured discussion guide to promote consistency across groups. Sessions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using content analysis. Results and Conclusions: Eight key categories of proactive strategies were identified and are listed in descending frequency of reports: dealing with it; engaging in life; exercising; seeking information; relying on God; changing dietary patterns; medicating; and self-monitoring. In addition, focus group discussions uncovered both benefits and challenges related to significant others that impacted their ability to successfully cope. Implications for Advancing the Nursing Research Agenda or Improving Quality of Care: This study provides an insider's view that expands nurses' understanding of how minority elders cope day-to-day with multiple chronic conditions and the role that significant others play in elders' successful coping. In addition, living with chronic illnesses was found to be a highly personal journey and findings point to the importance of models of practice that promote active participation in self-care. Finally, this study will be a basis for the development of an intervention study to facilitate older adults in effective management of their multiple health conditions, since better coping with comorbidity will contribute to the Healthy People 2010 goal of increasing elders' years of functional life (USDHHS, 2001).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMinority Elders Staying in Control of Multiple Chronic Conditionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153584-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Minority Elders Staying in Control of Multiple Chronic Conditions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Loeb, Susan J., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Pennsylvania State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">SVL100@PSU.EDU</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Uncover how community-dwelling minority elders with comorbidity minimize the negative consequences of their chronic conditions Specific Aims: 1) To identify proactive strategies used by minority elders to cope daily with comorbidity. 2) To uncover how significant others impact minority elders' success in chronic illness management. Methods: This study was conducted using focus group methodology to explore the strategies employed by minority elders (n=29) to manage multiple chronic health conditions. Inclusion criteria were: age &gt; 55; ethnic/racial minority; community dwelling; and have &gt; 2 chronic conditions. Five focus groups were conducted and saturation was achieved. The moderator used a semi-structured discussion guide to promote consistency across groups. Sessions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using content analysis. Results and Conclusions: Eight key categories of proactive strategies were identified and are listed in descending frequency of reports: dealing with it; engaging in life; exercising; seeking information; relying on God; changing dietary patterns; medicating; and self-monitoring. In addition, focus group discussions uncovered both benefits and challenges related to significant others that impacted their ability to successfully cope. Implications for Advancing the Nursing Research Agenda or Improving Quality of Care: This study provides an insider's view that expands nurses' understanding of how minority elders cope day-to-day with multiple chronic conditions and the role that significant others play in elders' successful coping. In addition, living with chronic illnesses was found to be a highly personal journey and findings point to the importance of models of practice that promote active participation in self-care. Finally, this study will be a basis for the development of an intervention study to facilitate older adults in effective management of their multiple health conditions, since better coping with comorbidity will contribute to the Healthy People 2010 goal of increasing elders' years of functional life (USDHHS, 2001).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:22:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:22:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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