2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153585
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learned Resourcefulness and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents
Abstract:
Learned Resourcefulness and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Huang, Chiung-Yu, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Meiho Institute of Technology
Title:Assistant Professor
Depression in adolescents is a widespread problem, which may cause negative consequences in their mental health, including suicidal problems. Worldwide, the prevalence of this condition is twice as higher in females than in males. To understand and characterize further the factors that may affect the development of depression in female adolescents in Taiwan, a cross-sectional, correlational design was used to examine the relationships among stressors, learned resourcefulness, and depressive symptoms. Results from this study suggest that low household income, unsatisfaction with grades, perceived poor health state, and poor peer relationship were statistically significant stressors affecting the development of depressive symptoms. Adolescents with higher learned resourcefulness had lower depressive symptoms. In addition, learned resourcefulness mediated the effect of perceived health and peer relationships on depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that depressive adolescents were in need of psychosocial support at this stage of their life. Healthcare providers may use this knowledge to deliver coping strategies such as use of learned resourcefulness to prevent their suicidal potential.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLearned Resourcefulness and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153585-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Learned Resourcefulness and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Huang, Chiung-Yu, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Meiho Institute of Technology</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">x2079@meiho.edu.tw</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Depression in adolescents is a widespread problem, which may cause negative consequences in their mental health, including suicidal problems. Worldwide, the prevalence of this condition is twice as higher in females than in males. To understand and characterize further the factors that may affect the development of depression in female adolescents in Taiwan, a cross-sectional, correlational design was used to examine the relationships among stressors, learned resourcefulness, and depressive symptoms. Results from this study suggest that low household income, unsatisfaction with grades, perceived poor health state, and poor peer relationship were statistically significant stressors affecting the development of depressive symptoms. Adolescents with higher learned resourcefulness had lower depressive symptoms. In addition, learned resourcefulness mediated the effect of perceived health and peer relationships on depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that depressive adolescents were in need of psychosocial support at this stage of their life. Healthcare providers may use this knowledge to deliver coping strategies such as use of learned resourcefulness to prevent their suicidal potential.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:22:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:22:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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