Unveiling the use of NANDA, NIC, and NOC Language With Clinical Reasoning Activities Using the Outcome Present State Test Model

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153587
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Unveiling the use of NANDA, NIC, and NOC Language With Clinical Reasoning Activities Using the Outcome Present State Test Model
Abstract:
Unveiling the use of NANDA, NIC, and NOC Language With Clinical Reasoning Activities Using the Outcome Present State Test Model
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kuiper, RuthAnne, PhD, RN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Carolina, Wilmington
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Donald D. Kautz, PhD; Randy L. Williams, BSN
Purpose: The purpose of this project was to evaluate student's use of NANDA, NIC, NOC (NNN) language during clinical reasoning activities with the Outcome-Present State Test Model (OPT). Methods: A quasi-experimental design evaluated the use of the OPT model as a teaching-learning tool over a 10 week period of clinical experiences on acute care units with junior level nursing students. Secondary analysis was conducted on OPT model worksheets from 10 students using a ôNNN Scoring Gridö. Findings: Extracted from a larger sample, 100 OPT models were evaluated using NANDA diagnoses, NOC outcomes, NOC indicators, NIC interventions, and NIC activities from the official resources of the Iowa Intervention and Outcomes Projects. The investigators determined that NOC outcomes were implied rather than stated the majority of the time. The interventions listed on the OPT worksheets were identified as linked to NIC interventions and activities associated with a NOC. Additional activities were listed but unrelated to NIC and connected to multiple health problems. Inter-rater agreement was determined to be 60% for NOC and 50% for NIC, reflecting the different views of the investigators. Discussion: Group analysis revealed students were efficient in using the OPT model worksheets in the first few weeks and chose case specific outcomes and interventions using some NNN language from a variety of resources. The findings reveal the challenges in identifying and teaching holistic care planning to students for patients with multiple health problems. Conclusions: Frequent faculty feedback is crucial for successful use of the OPT model of clinical reasoning and nursing language. Cognitive training of student thinking with the use of the OPT model and official nursing language could expand a repertoire of outcomes, interventions and activities based on research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnveiling the use of NANDA, NIC, and NOC Language With Clinical Reasoning Activities Using the Outcome Present State Test Modelen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153587-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Unveiling the use of NANDA, NIC, and NOC Language With Clinical Reasoning Activities Using the Outcome Present State Test Model</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kuiper, RuthAnne, PhD, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Carolina, Wilmington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kuiperr@uncw.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Donald D. Kautz, PhD; Randy L. Williams, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this project was to evaluate student's use of NANDA, NIC, NOC (NNN) language during clinical reasoning activities with the Outcome-Present State Test Model (OPT). Methods: A quasi-experimental design evaluated the use of the OPT model as a teaching-learning tool over a 10 week period of clinical experiences on acute care units with junior level nursing students. Secondary analysis was conducted on OPT model worksheets from 10 students using a &ocirc;NNN Scoring Grid&ouml;. Findings: Extracted from a larger sample, 100 OPT models were evaluated using NANDA diagnoses, NOC outcomes, NOC indicators, NIC interventions, and NIC activities from the official resources of the Iowa Intervention and Outcomes Projects. The investigators determined that NOC outcomes were implied rather than stated the majority of the time. The interventions listed on the OPT worksheets were identified as linked to NIC interventions and activities associated with a NOC. Additional activities were listed but unrelated to NIC and connected to multiple health problems. Inter-rater agreement was determined to be 60% for NOC and 50% for NIC, reflecting the different views of the investigators. Discussion: Group analysis revealed students were efficient in using the OPT model worksheets in the first few weeks and chose case specific outcomes and interventions using some NNN language from a variety of resources. The findings reveal the challenges in identifying and teaching holistic care planning to students for patients with multiple health problems. Conclusions: Frequent faculty feedback is crucial for successful use of the OPT model of clinical reasoning and nursing language. Cognitive training of student thinking with the use of the OPT model and official nursing language could expand a repertoire of outcomes, interventions and activities based on research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:22:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:22:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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