2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153588
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Risk of Chronic Disease Multi-Morbidity in American Indians
Abstract:
Risk of Chronic Disease Multi-Morbidity in American Indians
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Tann, Sheila S., RN, ND
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:assistant professor
Co-Authors:Scott Yabiku, PhD; Scott K. Okamoto, PhD; Jessica Yanow, BA
BACKGROUND: American Indian (AI) populations are afflicted disproportionately with a number of chronic illnesses. Specifically, the prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes, alcoholism, and depression have consistently been higher in this population. To date the majority of research has focused on these three disorders alone or in dyads; little attention has been given to the co-occurrence of all three simultaneously in AI populations. AIMS: This study reports an analysis of the prevalence and correlates of diabetes and associated risk factors for depression and alcoholism (referred to as triADD) in American Indian adults sampled in the fifty states as part of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). METHODS: The analysis was conducted using a national sample of 252,989 respondents. Variables included in this study were derived from 2003 BRFSS survey and measured risk factors including: diagnosis of diabetes, risk for heavy drinking, and number of days in the previous month in which the respondent felt his or her mental health was poor. Because the BRFSS data involve a complex multistage survey design, the SURVEYMEANS and SURVEYLOGISTIC procedures in SAS were used to conduct weighted analyses that account for multiple strata and primary sampling units. RESULTS: Multiple logistic regression was performed to estimate the race differences in the odds of having triADD, controlling for age, education, marital status, and income. Results indicate that Native Americans had the highest risk of triADD compared to whites (OR=12.5). CONCLUSIONS: Scientists and researchers have not explored the existence of a chronic disease multi-morbidity triad in this population. Compared with other ethnicities, the separate and combined presence of each of these conditions is highest in American Indian populations, even after controlling for marital status, income, education, and age group. These findings indicate the need for prevention interventions focused on health promotion specifically tailored toward this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRisk of Chronic Disease Multi-Morbidity in American Indiansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153588-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Risk of Chronic Disease Multi-Morbidity in American Indians</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tann, Sheila S., RN, ND</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">assistant professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sheila.tann@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Scott Yabiku, PhD; Scott K. Okamoto, PhD; Jessica Yanow, BA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: American Indian (AI) populations are afflicted disproportionately with a number of chronic illnesses. Specifically, the prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes, alcoholism, and depression have consistently been higher in this population. To date the majority of research has focused on these three disorders alone or in dyads; little attention has been given to the co-occurrence of all three simultaneously in AI populations. AIMS: This study reports an analysis of the prevalence and correlates of diabetes and associated risk factors for depression and alcoholism (referred to as triADD) in American Indian adults sampled in the fifty states as part of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). METHODS: The analysis was conducted using a national sample of 252,989 respondents. Variables included in this study were derived from 2003 BRFSS survey and measured risk factors including: diagnosis of diabetes, risk for heavy drinking, and number of days in the previous month in which the respondent felt his or her mental health was poor. Because the BRFSS data involve a complex multistage survey design, the SURVEYMEANS and SURVEYLOGISTIC procedures in SAS were used to conduct weighted analyses that account for multiple strata and primary sampling units. RESULTS: Multiple logistic regression was performed to estimate the race differences in the odds of having triADD, controlling for age, education, marital status, and income. Results indicate that Native Americans had the highest risk of triADD compared to whites (OR=12.5). CONCLUSIONS: Scientists and researchers have not explored the existence of a chronic disease multi-morbidity triad in this population. Compared with other ethnicities, the separate and combined presence of each of these conditions is highest in American Indian populations, even after controlling for marital status, income, education, and age group. These findings indicate the need for prevention interventions focused on health promotion specifically tailored toward this population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:22:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:22:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.