Relationship of Perceived Health Status Among Pregnant Women and Premature Termination of Drug Treatment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153602
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship of Perceived Health Status Among Pregnant Women and Premature Termination of Drug Treatment
Abstract:
Relationship of Perceived Health Status Among Pregnant Women and Premature Termination of Drug Treatment
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:WaltonûMoss, Benita Jeanne, DNS
P.I. Institution Name:Johns Hopkins University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Linda McIntosh, PhD, RN, LPC; Jessica Conrad, MSN, APRN, BC; Erika Kiefer, BSN
Substance abuse and dependence continues to be a significant problem but it is particularly concerning when it involves pregnant women who are substance dependent. Negative birth outcomes among drug-exposed infants notably include low birthweight and prematurity, the primary contributors to infant death. Positive birth outcomes depend, in part, on obtaining adequate prenatal care, ideally in comprehensive drug treatment programs. Unfortunately, women often do not remain in treatment until delivery. This study was conducted to better understand the physical and mental health status of low-income pregnant women in substance abuse treatment in urban environments. This analysis will report on differences between women who prematurely terminated treatment and women who completed treatment. This study was conducted in a program that provides comprehensive hospital-based treatment including intensive multidisciplinary services for substance abuse, mental health, obstetrical, gynecological, and family planning, and pediatric care. The women were predominantly African American in their late 20s, unemployed, never married, with less than a high school education, with either cocaine or opiate dependence. Upon entry into treatment, 159 women were interviewed about their perceptions of their health status as measured by the General Health Survey Form (SF36) and Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). Approximately 60% completed treatment and 40%) failed to complete treatment. Birth outcomes looked similar between the two groups. Although SF36 scores were also similar, mental health as measured by the BSI were different. Women with BSI scores suggesting less psychiatric distress were more likely to leave treatment prior to completion compared to women who completed treatment suggesting that additional interventions may need to be directed toward pregnant women with better perceived mental health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship of Perceived Health Status Among Pregnant Women and Premature Termination of Drug Treatmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153602-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship of Perceived Health Status Among Pregnant Women and Premature Termination of Drug Treatment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Walton&ucirc;Moss, Benita Jeanne, DNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Johns Hopkins University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bmoss@son.jhmi.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linda McIntosh, PhD, RN, LPC; Jessica Conrad, MSN, APRN, BC; Erika Kiefer, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Substance abuse and dependence continues to be a significant problem but it is particularly concerning when it involves pregnant women who are substance dependent. Negative birth outcomes among drug-exposed infants notably include low birthweight and prematurity, the primary contributors to infant death. Positive birth outcomes depend, in part, on obtaining adequate prenatal care, ideally in comprehensive drug treatment programs. Unfortunately, women often do not remain in treatment until delivery. This study was conducted to better understand the physical and mental health status of low-income pregnant women in substance abuse treatment in urban environments. This analysis will report on differences between women who prematurely terminated treatment and women who completed treatment. This study was conducted in a program that provides comprehensive hospital-based treatment including intensive multidisciplinary services for substance abuse, mental health, obstetrical, gynecological, and family planning, and pediatric care. The women were predominantly African American in their late 20s, unemployed, never married, with less than a high school education, with either cocaine or opiate dependence. Upon entry into treatment, 159 women were interviewed about their perceptions of their health status as measured by the General Health Survey Form (SF36) and Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). Approximately 60% completed treatment and 40%) failed to complete treatment. Birth outcomes looked similar between the two groups. Although SF36 scores were also similar, mental health as measured by the BSI were different. Women with BSI scores suggesting less psychiatric distress were more likely to leave treatment prior to completion compared to women who completed treatment suggesting that additional interventions may need to be directed toward pregnant women with better perceived mental health.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:23:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:23:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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