A Naturalistic Investigation of Alternatives to Restraint Use in an Acute Care Setting

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153608
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Naturalistic Investigation of Alternatives to Restraint Use in an Acute Care Setting
Abstract:
A Naturalistic Investigation of Alternatives to Restraint Use in an Acute Care Setting
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Norris III, John S., RN, MN
P.I. Institution Name:Bellflower Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente
Title:Clinical Director
Co-Authors:Candice Rogers, RN, BA; Anna Omery, RN, DNSc
The goal of this study was to provide knowledge that could be used to maximize the use of alternatives to restraints and minimize the use of restraints. The objectives of this naturalistic study were to describe the pattern of restraint use, determine the relationship between the alternatives attempted and the type of restraint use, and to determine if any of a selected group of patient focused variables are predictors of the type of restraints attempted, restraint use, or complications secondary to restraints. Data for this cross sectional survey were collected from existing quality forms. These forms were completed for every incidence of restraint use from January 1, 2002 to October 31, 2004. Data analysis included descriptive, correlational, and linear regression statistics. There were 6079 restraint episodes in 1698 patients. There were 13.33 patients in restraints/1000 patient days and 47.42 episodes/1000 patient days. The most frequent type of restraint used was wrist restraints (~80%). Patients in restraints more frequently had a diagnosis of respiratory failure (8.9%) or pneumonia (6.7%). Patients were most likely to be out of restraints on the night shift (41.3%) and less likely to be out on the day shift (23.7%). While nurses used a repertoire of alternatives, observation and reorientation were the most common alternatives tried prior to restraint use across all shifts. There were no statistical relationships between the alternatives tried and type of restraint use. Age was the only statistically significant predictor with the younger the person in restraints, the more likely the alternative was tried. The results support the conclusion that nurses are using a variety of alternatives prior to the use of restraints. They need, however, a larger tool box of alternatives immediately available in the clinical setting as well as evidence as to which alternatives might be effective in specific patient types.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Naturalistic Investigation of Alternatives to Restraint Use in an Acute Care Settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153608-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Naturalistic Investigation of Alternatives to Restraint Use in an Acute Care Setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Norris III, John S., RN, MN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Bellflower Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Director</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">John.S.Norris@kp.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Candice Rogers, RN, BA; Anna Omery, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The goal of this study was to provide knowledge that could be used to maximize the use of alternatives to restraints and minimize the use of restraints. The objectives of this naturalistic study were to describe the pattern of restraint use, determine the relationship between the alternatives attempted and the type of restraint use, and to determine if any of a selected group of patient focused variables are predictors of the type of restraints attempted, restraint use, or complications secondary to restraints. Data for this cross sectional survey were collected from existing quality forms. These forms were completed for every incidence of restraint use from January 1, 2002 to October 31, 2004. Data analysis included descriptive, correlational, and linear regression statistics. There were 6079 restraint episodes in 1698 patients. There were 13.33 patients in restraints/1000 patient days and 47.42 episodes/1000 patient days. The most frequent type of restraint used was wrist restraints (~80%). Patients in restraints more frequently had a diagnosis of respiratory failure (8.9%) or pneumonia (6.7%). Patients were most likely to be out of restraints on the night shift (41.3%) and less likely to be out on the day shift (23.7%). While nurses used a repertoire of alternatives, observation and reorientation were the most common alternatives tried prior to restraint use across all shifts. There were no statistical relationships between the alternatives tried and type of restraint use. Age was the only statistically significant predictor with the younger the person in restraints, the more likely the alternative was tried. The results support the conclusion that nurses are using a variety of alternatives prior to the use of restraints. They need, however, a larger tool box of alternatives immediately available in the clinical setting as well as evidence as to which alternatives might be effective in specific patient types.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:23:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:23:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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