Factors and Experiences Influencing Retention in HIV-Oriented Primary Medical Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153615
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors and Experiences Influencing Retention in HIV-Oriented Primary Medical Care
Abstract:
Factors and Experiences Influencing Retention in HIV-Oriented Primary Medical Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Relf, Michael V., PhD, APRN, BC, AACRN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Georgetown University, School of Nursing and Health Studies
Title:Assistant Professor & Chair, Dept of Professional Nursing
Co-Authors:Debra Dekker, PhD; Kevin Mallinson, PhD, RN, AACRN
Objective: Since HIV has become a chronic illness, active participation in HIV-oriented primary care is critical to managing medications, improving functioning, and maintaining quality of life for persons living with HIV/AIDS. Therefore, to understand factors influencing regular utilization of HIV-oriented primary medical care, a mixed methods study was conducted to identify demographic and psychosocial variables associated with sporadic use and non-engagement in care. Design/Methods/Variables: Using a retrospective predictive, correlational design combined with grounded theory interviews, demographic correlates associated with retention in HIV-oriented primary care as well as the processes and factors of health care seeking behaviors were examined. Sample: Participants in this study were individuals who voluntarily enrolled in HIV-oriented medical care at a large urban HIV clinic. During the last six months of 2001, 161 new patients voluntarily enrolled in HIV-oriented primary care. These patients were followed for 18 months and then classified as regular users, sporadic users, or non-engagers. Among the regular and sporadic users, qualitative interviews were conducted until theoretical saturation was identified. Findings/Conclusions: Qualitatively, individuals have ôstigmasö and ôobstaclesö to overcome in order to be ôconnectedö to the health system. Additionally, ôhealth literacyö was critical in facilitating life mastery leading to regular engagement in care. Quantitatively, three variables predicted retention in HIV-oriented primary medical care. These three variables, race/ethnicity, years clean from drugs, and employment status, yielded a predictive model that was highly sensitive and specific. Implications for Nursing Practice: Results of this study were used to develop an algorithm to screen for high-risk of non-retention in HIV-oriented primary medical care for new clients. Based on findings from this study, a model of care was designed to promote retention in care among new clients identified to be at high-risk of dropping out or sporadic use.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors and Experiences Influencing Retention in HIV-Oriented Primary Medical Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153615-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors and Experiences Influencing Retention in HIV-Oriented Primary Medical Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Relf, Michael V., PhD, APRN, BC, AACRN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Georgetown University, School of Nursing and Health Studies</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor &amp; Chair, Dept of Professional Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mrelf01@georgetown.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Debra Dekker, PhD; Kevin Mallinson, PhD, RN, AACRN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Since HIV has become a chronic illness, active participation in HIV-oriented primary care is critical to managing medications, improving functioning, and maintaining quality of life for persons living with HIV/AIDS. Therefore, to understand factors influencing regular utilization of HIV-oriented primary medical care, a mixed methods study was conducted to identify demographic and psychosocial variables associated with sporadic use and non-engagement in care. Design/Methods/Variables: Using a retrospective predictive, correlational design combined with grounded theory interviews, demographic correlates associated with retention in HIV-oriented primary care as well as the processes and factors of health care seeking behaviors were examined. Sample: Participants in this study were individuals who voluntarily enrolled in HIV-oriented medical care at a large urban HIV clinic. During the last six months of 2001, 161 new patients voluntarily enrolled in HIV-oriented primary care. These patients were followed for 18 months and then classified as regular users, sporadic users, or non-engagers. Among the regular and sporadic users, qualitative interviews were conducted until theoretical saturation was identified. Findings/Conclusions: Qualitatively, individuals have &ocirc;stigmas&ouml; and &ocirc;obstacles&ouml; to overcome in order to be &ocirc;connected&ouml; to the health system. Additionally, &ocirc;health literacy&ouml; was critical in facilitating life mastery leading to regular engagement in care. Quantitatively, three variables predicted retention in HIV-oriented primary medical care. These three variables, race/ethnicity, years clean from drugs, and employment status, yielded a predictive model that was highly sensitive and specific. Implications for Nursing Practice: Results of this study were used to develop an algorithm to screen for high-risk of non-retention in HIV-oriented primary medical care for new clients. Based on findings from this study, a model of care was designed to promote retention in care among new clients identified to be at high-risk of dropping out or sporadic use.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:23:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:23:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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