The Impact of Utilizing High-Fidelity Human Patient Simulation on Critical Thinking Abilities and Learning Outcomes in Undergraduate Nursing Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153621
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Utilizing High-Fidelity Human Patient Simulation on Critical Thinking Abilities and Learning Outcomes in Undergraduate Nursing Students
Abstract:
The Impact of Utilizing High-Fidelity Human Patient Simulation on Critical Thinking Abilities and Learning Outcomes in Undergraduate Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Schumacher, Lori, PhD, RN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Medical College of Georgia
Title:Assistant Professor
Purpose: To compare critical thinking abilities and learning outcomes of beginning undergraduate, baccalaureate nursing students when three instructional strategies (traditional didactic classroom, high-fidelity human patient simulation, and a combination of classroom and simulation) are used to illustrate the nursing care of clients experiencing an emergent cardiovascular or respiratory event during three learning activities. Design & Methods: In this descriptive, quasi-experimental study, 36 nursing students, from the southeast United States, were randomized into three groups. Each group received a separate instructional strategy for each of the three learning activities. After the completion of each learning activity, critical thinking abilities and learning outcomes were measured through the administration of a customized HESI examination. One-way ANOVA calculations were conducted to determine the effect of instructional strategies on critical thinking abilities and learning outcomes. Bonferroni post hoc comparisons were employed to evaluate significant (p<0.05) differences between groups. Findings: There were no statistically significant differences between critical thinking abilities (p>0.08) or learning outcomes (p>0.12) of beginning nursing students when traditional didactic classroom instruction was utilized to deliver a learning activity. HESI exam scores were higher and statistically significant differences were detected between critical thinking abilities (pú0.002) and learning outcomes (pú0.001) of beginning nursing students when high-fidelity human patient simulation or a combination of classroom and simulation were utilized to deliver a learning activity. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that utilizing the instructional strategies of high-fidelity human patient simulation and a combination of classroom and simulation were effective for some learning activities. Further research is needed to examine the impact of high-fidelity human patient simulation on student's critical thinking abilities and learning outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Utilizing High-Fidelity Human Patient Simulation on Critical Thinking Abilities and Learning Outcomes in Undergraduate Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153621-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Impact of Utilizing High-Fidelity Human Patient Simulation on Critical Thinking Abilities and Learning Outcomes in Undergraduate Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schumacher, Lori, PhD, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical College of Georgia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lschumacher@mail.mcg.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To compare critical thinking abilities and learning outcomes of beginning undergraduate, baccalaureate nursing students when three instructional strategies (traditional didactic classroom, high-fidelity human patient simulation, and a combination of classroom and simulation) are used to illustrate the nursing care of clients experiencing an emergent cardiovascular or respiratory event during three learning activities. Design &amp; Methods: In this descriptive, quasi-experimental study, 36 nursing students, from the southeast United States, were randomized into three groups. Each group received a separate instructional strategy for each of the three learning activities. After the completion of each learning activity, critical thinking abilities and learning outcomes were measured through the administration of a customized HESI examination. One-way ANOVA calculations were conducted to determine the effect of instructional strategies on critical thinking abilities and learning outcomes. Bonferroni post hoc comparisons were employed to evaluate significant (p&lt;0.05) differences between groups. Findings: There were no statistically significant differences between critical thinking abilities (p&gt;0.08) or learning outcomes (p&gt;0.12) of beginning nursing students when traditional didactic classroom instruction was utilized to deliver a learning activity. HESI exam scores were higher and statistically significant differences were detected between critical thinking abilities (p&uacute;0.002) and learning outcomes (p&uacute;0.001) of beginning nursing students when high-fidelity human patient simulation or a combination of classroom and simulation were utilized to deliver a learning activity. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that utilizing the instructional strategies of high-fidelity human patient simulation and a combination of classroom and simulation were effective for some learning activities. Further research is needed to examine the impact of high-fidelity human patient simulation on student's critical thinking abilities and learning outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:23:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:23:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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