2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153624
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Music for Pain Following Gynecological Surgery in Korea
Abstract:
Music for Pain Following Gynecological Surgery in Korea
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Ahn, Sukhee, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Pusan National University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Marion Good, PhD, RN
The purpose was to test effect of music on pain following gynecological surgery and to explore preferences and differences in effect between Korean vs American music in postoperative women in Korea. The 73 women were randomly assigned; 34 (47%) were in the music group and 39 (53%) in the control group. Those receiving music were given a choice of # types: 2 types of Korean music (ballads or religious) and # types of American music (name them). Pain control methods were according to physician order: Patient Controlled Epidural Analgesia (PCEA) (59%) or intravenous/intramuscular (IV/IM) (41%) methods of pain control. The majority of those in the music group chose the Korean selections: Korean ballad or religious music (n=20, 59%). With an experimental pretest-posttest design, chosen music was heard during 20 minutes of rest on postoperative days 1 and 2, am and pm. The control group rested for 20 minutes. Pain was measured with Visual Analogue Sensation and Distress of Pain scales. Analysis of Covariance while controlling for pretest pain scores, showed that the music group had significantly less posttest pain sensation and distress on day 1 pm and less sensation day 1 am. More Korean women chose Korean music, although nearly half chose American music to relax and distract during postoperative pain. Both Korean and American kinds of sedative music resulted in 9.3% to 23.7% less postoperative pain than analgesic medication alone.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMusic for Pain Following Gynecological Surgery in Koreaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153624-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Music for Pain Following Gynecological Surgery in Korea</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ahn, Sukhee, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Pusan National University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sukheeahn@pusan.ac.kr</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marion Good, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose was to test effect of music on pain following gynecological surgery and to explore preferences and differences in effect between Korean vs American music in postoperative women in Korea. The 73 women were randomly assigned; 34 (47%) were in the music group and 39 (53%) in the control group. Those receiving music were given a choice of # types: 2 types of Korean music (ballads or religious) and # types of American music (name them). Pain control methods were according to physician order: Patient Controlled Epidural Analgesia (PCEA) (59%) or intravenous/intramuscular (IV/IM) (41%) methods of pain control. The majority of those in the music group chose the Korean selections: Korean ballad or religious music (n=20, 59%). With an experimental pretest-posttest design, chosen music was heard during 20 minutes of rest on postoperative days 1 and 2, am and pm. The control group rested for 20 minutes. Pain was measured with Visual Analogue Sensation and Distress of Pain scales. Analysis of Covariance while controlling for pretest pain scores, showed that the music group had significantly less posttest pain sensation and distress on day 1 pm and less sensation day 1 am. More Korean women chose Korean music, although nearly half chose American music to relax and distract during postoperative pain. Both Korean and American kinds of sedative music resulted in 9.3% to 23.7% less postoperative pain than analgesic medication alone.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:23:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:23:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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