2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153629
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Reporting of Chest Pain: Does Gender Matter?
Abstract:
Self-Reporting of Chest Pain: Does Gender Matter?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Ulak, Linda J., EdD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Hall University
Title:Associate Dean, Baccalaureate Nursing Programs
Problem: Patients who have had a myocardial infarction are at risk of sustaining advanced cardiac damage from subsequent episodes of myocardial ischemia. Myocardial ischemia is often manifested as chest pain or other symptom such as arm tingling or numbness, or chest pressure. If a patient reports such episodes, interventions can be initiated to prevent an advancement of cardiac damage. Preliminary research suggests that post MI patientts do not consistently report symptoms of ischemia, and that there are reporting frequency differences between men and women. Purpose: This study investigated whether patients with documented myocardial infarctions report post MI episodes of ischemia to health care workers, factors influencing their reporting and if their reporting was related to the patient's gender. Methodology: The sample consisted of 80 patients. Interviews were conducted by the researcher within 48 hours of the paient's transfer from the I.C.U.. Data was analyzed descriptively and groups were compared by gender. 91.3% of men and 96.7% of women did not report episodes of chest pain. Only 18.4% of the sample reported all episodes of pain. Of those who reported pain, all reported it to the nurse while 1/3 reported it to the physician. Implications: Since not all episodes of pain are reported, all health care providers need to be keyed into this fact. In addition, nurses must remember to question about all forms of ischemia, not just chest pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Reporting of Chest Pain: Does Gender Matter?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153629-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Reporting of Chest Pain: Does Gender Matter?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ulak, Linda J., EdD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Hall University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean, Baccalaureate Nursing Programs</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ulaklind@shu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Patients who have had a myocardial infarction are at risk of sustaining advanced cardiac damage from subsequent episodes of myocardial ischemia. Myocardial ischemia is often manifested as chest pain or other symptom such as arm tingling or numbness, or chest pressure. If a patient reports such episodes, interventions can be initiated to prevent an advancement of cardiac damage. Preliminary research suggests that post MI patientts do not consistently report symptoms of ischemia, and that there are reporting frequency differences between men and women. Purpose: This study investigated whether patients with documented myocardial infarctions report post MI episodes of ischemia to health care workers, factors influencing their reporting and if their reporting was related to the patient's gender. Methodology: The sample consisted of 80 patients. Interviews were conducted by the researcher within 48 hours of the paient's transfer from the I.C.U.. Data was analyzed descriptively and groups were compared by gender. 91.3% of men and 96.7% of women did not report episodes of chest pain. Only 18.4% of the sample reported all episodes of pain. Of those who reported pain, all reported it to the nurse while 1/3 reported it to the physician. Implications: Since not all episodes of pain are reported, all health care providers need to be keyed into this fact. In addition, nurses must remember to question about all forms of ischemia, not just chest pain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:24:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:24:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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