The Effect of Relationship Violence on HIV Risk and Psychological Well-Being Among Latinas in the United States

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153633
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Relationship Violence on HIV Risk and Psychological Well-Being Among Latinas in the United States
Abstract:
The Effect of Relationship Violence on HIV Risk and Psychological Well-Being Among Latinas in the United States
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Peragallo, Nilda (Nena), RN, DrPH, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Miami
Title:Dean and Professor
Co-Authors:Bruce R. DeForge, PhD; Elias Vasquez, PhD, NP, FAAN; Patricia Yali, RN, BSN
Background: To assess the effects of current relationship violence on HIV risk factors and psychological wellbeing among Latino women living the United States. Method: As part of a culturally tailored HIV risk reduction intervention in Chicago, Illinois, interview data was collected from 657 low-income, sexually active Latinas, aged 18-44. Data collected included: demographics (education completed, ethnicity, marital status, religion, cohabitation status), acculturation status (Hispanic, non-Hispanic), relationship violence in the past 3 months (being hurt by a partner, having forced sex, calling the police), HIV risk factors (multiple partners, risk through partner, % condom use), self-esteem (Rosenberg), depressive symptoms (CES-D). Analysis was done using multiple and logistic regression techniques. Results: For women in this sample current relationship violence was positively related to having multiple partners (OR = 9.11, p < 0.01, 95% CI: 3.96 to 20.95), HIV risk through partners (OR = 1.99, p < 0.05, 95% CI: 1.01 to 3.93) and depression (b = 8.1, p < 0.001). Current relationship violence was negatively related to self-esteem (b = -2.5, p < 0.001) and not related at all to % condom use. Conclusions: Low-income Latinas have high HIV infection rates, primarily through heterosexual sex. They also report high levels of violence on the part of their current partners. Relationship violence is associated with primary HIV risk factors and psychological wellbeing and may hinder efforts to reduce their risk factors. HIV interventions for this group of women must address their level of relationship violence if these interventions are to be effective.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Relationship Violence on HIV Risk and Psychological Well-Being Among Latinas in the United Statesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153633-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Relationship Violence on HIV Risk and Psychological Well-Being Among Latinas in the United States</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Peragallo, Nilda (Nena), RN, DrPH, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Miami</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean and Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nperagallo@miami.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bruce R. DeForge, PhD; Elias Vasquez, PhD, NP, FAAN; Patricia Yali, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: To assess the effects of current relationship violence on HIV risk factors and psychological wellbeing among Latino women living the United States. Method: As part of a culturally tailored HIV risk reduction intervention in Chicago, Illinois, interview data was collected from 657 low-income, sexually active Latinas, aged 18-44. Data collected included: demographics (education completed, ethnicity, marital status, religion, cohabitation status), acculturation status (Hispanic, non-Hispanic), relationship violence in the past 3 months (being hurt by a partner, having forced sex, calling the police), HIV risk factors (multiple partners, risk through partner, % condom use), self-esteem (Rosenberg), depressive symptoms (CES-D). Analysis was done using multiple and logistic regression techniques. Results: For women in this sample current relationship violence was positively related to having multiple partners (OR = 9.11, p &lt; 0.01, 95% CI: 3.96 to 20.95), HIV risk through partners (OR = 1.99, p &lt; 0.05, 95% CI: 1.01 to 3.93) and depression (b = 8.1, p &lt; 0.001). Current relationship violence was negatively related to self-esteem (b = -2.5, p &lt; 0.001) and not related at all to % condom use. Conclusions: Low-income Latinas have high HIV infection rates, primarily through heterosexual sex. They also report high levels of violence on the part of their current partners. Relationship violence is associated with primary HIV risk factors and psychological wellbeing and may hinder efforts to reduce their risk factors. HIV interventions for this group of women must address their level of relationship violence if these interventions are to be effective.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:24:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:24:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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