2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153634
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recruitment and Retention of Diverse Students: Is Racism an Issue?
Abstract:
Recruitment and Retention of Diverse Students: Is Racism an Issue?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Evans, Bronwynne, PhD, RN, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State Unversity
Title:Associate Professor
Increased diversity in the nursing workforce requires that students of color are successful in nursing programs. However, there are numerous barriers to success of such students and only isolated efforts have aimed at recruiting and retaining students of color (Coffman, Rosenoff, & Grumbach, 2001). Even these efforts begin with small numbers of students and may not exist long enough to create the critical mass of diverse graduates needed to bring others into nursing. This presentation will report a portion of the outcomes of a three-year, federally funded Nursing Workforce Diversity Grant (ALCANCE) aimed at increasing the numbers of Hispanic/Latino and American Indian BSN graduates. Because of small student numbers, evaluation of such efforts must rely on descriptive statistics or qualitative data. Although ALCANCE increased by 275% the number of Hispanic/Latino and American Indian students during the first two years of the grant period (100% student retention), a total of only 18 students were enrolled and received stipends. Data from content-validated 76-item questionnaires (Likert scale 1-5) completed by ALCANCE stipend recipients were entered into SPSS. Students rated (1) importance and (2) satisfaction with each item in regard to both the college and the ALCANCE program. Fifteen Hispanic/Latino (males = 2; females = 10) and American Indian (males = 0; females = 13) students responded to the questionnaire each semester they were enrolled. Most item means across the semesters, such as satisfaction with staff, were high for both the college and ALCANCE but there was a remarkable student silence (non-response) in regard to racism in the college. However, when responses to open-ended questions were clustered into themes, students noted ôlip-service to cultural competenceö and the need for education of faculty, staff, and administrators in dealing with prejudice, racism, and cultural differences. A complete report will be provided at the session.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecruitment and Retention of Diverse Students: Is Racism an Issue?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153634-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Recruitment and Retention of Diverse Students: Is Racism an Issue?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Evans, Bronwynne, PhD, RN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State Unversity</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bronwynne.evans@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Increased diversity in the nursing workforce requires that students of color are successful in nursing programs. However, there are numerous barriers to success of such students and only isolated efforts have aimed at recruiting and retaining students of color (Coffman, Rosenoff, &amp; Grumbach, 2001). Even these efforts begin with small numbers of students and may not exist long enough to create the critical mass of diverse graduates needed to bring others into nursing. This presentation will report a portion of the outcomes of a three-year, federally funded Nursing Workforce Diversity Grant (ALCANCE) aimed at increasing the numbers of Hispanic/Latino and American Indian BSN graduates. Because of small student numbers, evaluation of such efforts must rely on descriptive statistics or qualitative data. Although ALCANCE increased by 275% the number of Hispanic/Latino and American Indian students during the first two years of the grant period (100% student retention), a total of only 18 students were enrolled and received stipends. Data from content-validated 76-item questionnaires (Likert scale 1-5) completed by ALCANCE stipend recipients were entered into SPSS. Students rated (1) importance and (2) satisfaction with each item in regard to both the college and the ALCANCE program. Fifteen Hispanic/Latino (males = 2; females = 10) and American Indian (males = 0; females = 13) students responded to the questionnaire each semester they were enrolled. Most item means across the semesters, such as satisfaction with staff, were high for both the college and ALCANCE but there was a remarkable student silence (non-response) in regard to racism in the college. However, when responses to open-ended questions were clustered into themes, students noted &ocirc;lip-service to cultural competence&ouml; and the need for education of faculty, staff, and administrators in dealing with prejudice, racism, and cultural differences. A complete report will be provided at the session.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:24:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:24:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.