2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153637
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How Do Older Farm Residents Define Good Health?
Abstract:
How Do Older Farm Residents Define Good Health?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Reed, Deborah, PhD, MSPH, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kentucky
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Mary Kay Rayens, PhD
Introduction: How a person defines ôgood healthö is linked to one's culture, personal life experiences, family, and environmental context. Historically, rural residents identify health as the ability to work. This characterization has been questioned as the rural culture diversified. The definition of health specific to the rural farm population has not yet been examined. Method: The data are from the baseline interview of a longitudinal study of 1,423 Kentucky and South Carolina farm residents aged 50 and over. Participants were surveyed about their definition of health, health conditions, recent injuries, satisfaction with farm work, work practices, and demographic characteristics. Respondents were grouped by whether they defined health as ability to work versus absence of pain, disease, or not having to take medication. Bivariate analysis consisted of t-tests, Wilcoxon tests, and chi-square tests. Predictors of health definition were determined using logistic regression. Results: Nearly one-half of participants (42%) characterized health as the ability to work, compared with the remaining 58% who chose lack of physical distress (i.e., no pain, disease or medications). This binary health definition was unrelated to age, gender, education, state of residence, number of health conditions, or number of injuries. There were associations between health definition and number of farm tasks completed in the past year, hours spent doing farm work in the past week, and satisfaction with farm work. Controlling for age, gender, and education, number of farm tasks completed in the past year was a significant predictor of health definition, with increased odds of choosing æability to work' as the definition with increasing farm tasks performed. Conclusion: For an older working population the definition of health may be driven by what the person can accomplish rather than by physical symptoms or medical treatment. When providing care, nurses should consider the importance of work to the patient.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow Do Older Farm Residents Define Good Health?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153637-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How Do Older Farm Residents Define Good Health?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reed, Deborah, PhD, MSPH, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kentucky</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dbreed01@pop.uky.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Kay Rayens, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: How a person defines &ocirc;good health&ouml; is linked to one's culture, personal life experiences, family, and environmental context. Historically, rural residents identify health as the ability to work. This characterization has been questioned as the rural culture diversified. The definition of health specific to the rural farm population has not yet been examined. Method: The data are from the baseline interview of a longitudinal study of 1,423 Kentucky and South Carolina farm residents aged 50 and over. Participants were surveyed about their definition of health, health conditions, recent injuries, satisfaction with farm work, work practices, and demographic characteristics. Respondents were grouped by whether they defined health as ability to work versus absence of pain, disease, or not having to take medication. Bivariate analysis consisted of t-tests, Wilcoxon tests, and chi-square tests. Predictors of health definition were determined using logistic regression. Results: Nearly one-half of participants (42%) characterized health as the ability to work, compared with the remaining 58% who chose lack of physical distress (i.e., no pain, disease or medications). This binary health definition was unrelated to age, gender, education, state of residence, number of health conditions, or number of injuries. There were associations between health definition and number of farm tasks completed in the past year, hours spent doing farm work in the past week, and satisfaction with farm work. Controlling for age, gender, and education, number of farm tasks completed in the past year was a significant predictor of health definition, with increased odds of choosing &aelig;ability to work' as the definition with increasing farm tasks performed. Conclusion: For an older working population the definition of health may be driven by what the person can accomplish rather than by physical symptoms or medical treatment. When providing care, nurses should consider the importance of work to the patient.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:24:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:24:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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