Health Literacy, Health Information Preferences, and Adherence in Vulnerable Groups

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153646
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Literacy, Health Information Preferences, and Adherence in Vulnerable Groups
Abstract:
Health Literacy, Health Information Preferences, and Adherence in Vulnerable Groups
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Leasure, A. Renee, PhD, RN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
Title:Associate Professor, Deputy Director of the Oklahoma Evidence Based Practice Institute: A collaborating center of JBI
Co-Authors:Dorothy C. Belknap, PhD, ARNP; Mary Ann Pascucci, APRN, PhD; Elsia Kodumthara, BSN, MSN
Low and limited health literacy has been linked to poorer self-management of chronic diseases, less healthy behaviors, higher rates of hospitalization, and overall poorer health. Subjects were drawn from a Veteran's Affairs Medical Center outpatient clinic setting and participated in face-to-face interviews which lasted approximately one and one-half hour. Health Literacy, the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions was measured using the TOFHLA which measures reading comprehension and numeracy. Of the fifty-five subjects, 75% demonstrated adequate health literacy, 16% marginal, and 9% inadequate health literacy. Older participants had lower levels of health literacy (r=-.39, p=.002). Higher levels of health literacy were associated with more years of formal education (r=.343), p=.006). Participants with marginal and inadequate levels of health literacy were prescribed an average of 8 routine medications as compared to an average of 6 for those with adequate levels of health literacy. Higher health literacy scores were associated with higher levels of medication compliance. Results of interviews indicated the most frequent reason for missing a dose of medication was ôI just forgotö. Several instances were shared where participants purposefully cut back or stopped taking a dose of medication. Reports included, ôthe Lisinopril made me feel fatigued so I quit taking itö and ôI go ahead and finish the prescription I have before I make the changeö. Homeless informant's devised complex plans to receive their medicines, protect medicines from theft, and developed strategies to take medications as prescribed. Adhering to a health diet was considered to be more expensive, more difficult to follow, and extra effort to prepare. While lack of motivation was cited as a reason for not exercising, feelings of deprivation were cited as the reason for not following dietary recommendations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Literacy, Health Information Preferences, and Adherence in Vulnerable Groupsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153646-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Literacy, Health Information Preferences, and Adherence in Vulnerable Groups</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Leasure, A. Renee, PhD, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor, Deputy Director of the Oklahoma Evidence Based Practice Institute: A collaborating center of JBI</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">renee-leasure@ouhsc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Dorothy C. Belknap, PhD, ARNP; Mary Ann Pascucci, APRN, PhD; Elsia Kodumthara, BSN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Low and limited health literacy has been linked to poorer self-management of chronic diseases, less healthy behaviors, higher rates of hospitalization, and overall poorer health. Subjects were drawn from a Veteran's Affairs Medical Center outpatient clinic setting and participated in face-to-face interviews which lasted approximately one and one-half hour. Health Literacy, the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions was measured using the TOFHLA which measures reading comprehension and numeracy. Of the fifty-five subjects, 75% demonstrated adequate health literacy, 16% marginal, and 9% inadequate health literacy. Older participants had lower levels of health literacy (r=-.39, p=.002). Higher levels of health literacy were associated with more years of formal education (r=.343), p=.006). Participants with marginal and inadequate levels of health literacy were prescribed an average of 8 routine medications as compared to an average of 6 for those with adequate levels of health literacy. Higher health literacy scores were associated with higher levels of medication compliance. Results of interviews indicated the most frequent reason for missing a dose of medication was &ocirc;I just forgot&ouml;. Several instances were shared where participants purposefully cut back or stopped taking a dose of medication. Reports included, &ocirc;the Lisinopril made me feel fatigued so I quit taking it&ouml; and &ocirc;I go ahead and finish the prescription I have before I make the change&ouml;. Homeless informant's devised complex plans to receive their medicines, protect medicines from theft, and developed strategies to take medications as prescribed. Adhering to a health diet was considered to be more expensive, more difficult to follow, and extra effort to prepare. While lack of motivation was cited as a reason for not exercising, feelings of deprivation were cited as the reason for not following dietary recommendations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:24:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:24:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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