2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153650
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Validation of Culturally Sensitive Care in Reducing Health Care Disparity
Abstract:
Validation of Culturally Sensitive Care in Reducing Health Care Disparity
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Sampson, Teresa, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Christus St. Joseph Hospital
Title:clinical Educator
Co-Authors:Audrey Theiler, RN; Susan Willmann, RN, MSN; Shyang-Yun P. K. Shiao, PhD, RN, FAAN
Athough some information is available on culturally competent care, evidence about the application of culturally sensitive care (CSC) with sufficient elements for clinical acute care is limited. To generate evidence for nursing interventions and coordinated care, the purposes of this study are to validate a refined CSC tool with elements of care relevant for acute care settings, and to examine the usefulness of coordinated CSC process in reducing healthcare disparities. Two hundred subjects will be randomly recruited and assigned to two groups based on age, gender, ethnicity, and length of time since diagnosis. The sample will be drawn to represent the hospital's current ethnic mix (30% African American, 30% Caucasian, 30% Hispanic, and 10% Other). For focused outcome measurements, diabetes patients will be recruited. The experimental group will be assessed with the refined CSC tool to understand patient's healthcare beliefs, practice, decision-making process, and their goal for hospitalization; and these elements will be integrated into an individualized coordinated care plan. The control group will receive the routine care. Inter-rater agreement for data collection using the refined CSC tool will be closely validated and established with the first 10 subjects by two raters to reach 90% agreement; and maintained with every tenth subject. Patients will be followed throughout their hospitalization and follow-up phone calls will be conducted 1 month after discharge. Cultural awareness of health care providers will be assessed before and after implementation of the trial. Ethnic differences on patient outcomes between groups will be explored, including glycemic control, diabetic complications and symptoms, and health behaviors (exercise and diet). Care process and patient sense of participation and control over treatment goals for their hospital stay, and satisfaction will be compared. Future research can be designed to improve care outcomes for various ethnic groups based on this evidence from coordinated CSC.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleValidation of Culturally Sensitive Care in Reducing Health Care Disparityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153650-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Validation of Culturally Sensitive Care in Reducing Health Care Disparity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sampson, Teresa, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Christus St. Joseph Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">clinical Educator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">theresa.sampson@christushealth.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Audrey Theiler, RN; Susan Willmann, RN, MSN; Shyang-Yun P. K. Shiao, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Athough some information is available on culturally competent care, evidence about the application of culturally sensitive care (CSC) with sufficient elements for clinical acute care is limited. To generate evidence for nursing interventions and coordinated care, the purposes of this study are to validate a refined CSC tool with elements of care relevant for acute care settings, and to examine the usefulness of coordinated CSC process in reducing healthcare disparities. Two hundred subjects will be randomly recruited and assigned to two groups based on age, gender, ethnicity, and length of time since diagnosis. The sample will be drawn to represent the hospital's current ethnic mix (30% African American, 30% Caucasian, 30% Hispanic, and 10% Other). For focused outcome measurements, diabetes patients will be recruited. The experimental group will be assessed with the refined CSC tool to understand patient's healthcare beliefs, practice, decision-making process, and their goal for hospitalization; and these elements will be integrated into an individualized coordinated care plan. The control group will receive the routine care. Inter-rater agreement for data collection using the refined CSC tool will be closely validated and established with the first 10 subjects by two raters to reach 90% agreement; and maintained with every tenth subject. Patients will be followed throughout their hospitalization and follow-up phone calls will be conducted 1 month after discharge. Cultural awareness of health care providers will be assessed before and after implementation of the trial. Ethnic differences on patient outcomes between groups will be explored, including glycemic control, diabetic complications and symptoms, and health behaviors (exercise and diet). Care process and patient sense of participation and control over treatment goals for their hospital stay, and satisfaction will be compared. Future research can be designed to improve care outcomes for various ethnic groups based on this evidence from coordinated CSC.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:25:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:25:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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