2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153658
Type:
Presentation
Title:
What’s the point of evidence-based nursing? A UK Perspective
Abstract:
What’s the point of evidence-based nursing? A UK Perspective
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Cullum, Nicky
P.I. Institution Name:University of York
The phrase "evidence based" was first used to describe an approach to health care (originally, to medicine) initially developed in Canada in the 1970s. Since the early developments, an evidence-based approach has been embraced by many governments, health professions and users of health services around the world. Evidence-based health care is driven by assumption that the best health care decisions are informed (but not dictated) by the best available, relevant research evidence. Nurses around the world were quick to explore an evidence-based approach to patient care as a way of maximizing the utility of nursing research for the benefit of patients. The UK Centre for Evidence-Based Nursing was established in 1995 for example, and others quickly followed in Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Canada, USA, and Germany [1]. A journal focusing on evidence-based nursing (EBN) was conceived in 1996 by the Canadian and UK centres, and to date has over 8,000 subscribers internationally. An editorial in this journal described evidence-based nursing as nursing which uses the best available research evidence alongside clinical expertise, patient preferences and the available resources [2]. This approach brings many challenges for nursing, not least: - a relatively short history of clinical research, therefore a dearth of good quality, clinically relevant research; - a lack of emphasis on how to use research in practice, in nurse training programmes; - a lack of access to research findings for clinical nurses; - a culture which often values experience above research based information. The UK Centre for EBN uses various strategies to address these challenges: 1] synthesizing research relevant to nursing practice by undertaking and updating systematic reviews of research; 2] training nurses and others in systematic review methodology; 3] collaborating in the production and dissemination of national clinical practice guidelines; 4] undertaking primary research in areas where research evidence is lacking (e.g. randomized trials of wound care interventions); 5] undertaking primary research into the use of information in nurse decision making and how this might be enhanced; 6] developing educational programmes for nurses in all aspects of evidence-based nursing. This paper will discuss our experiences in these broad areas, emphasizing the need for international collaboration in order to avoid duplication and maximize opportunities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhat’s the point of evidence-based nursing? A UK Perspectiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153658-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">What&rsquo;s the point of evidence-based nursing? A UK Perspective</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cullum, Nicky</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of York</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nac2@york.ac.uk</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The phrase &quot;evidence based&quot; was first used to describe an approach to health care (originally, to medicine) initially developed in Canada in the 1970s. Since the early developments, an evidence-based approach has been embraced by many governments, health professions and users of health services around the world. Evidence-based health care is driven by assumption that the best health care decisions are informed (but not dictated) by the best available, relevant research evidence. Nurses around the world were quick to explore an evidence-based approach to patient care as a way of maximizing the utility of nursing research for the benefit of patients. The UK Centre for Evidence-Based Nursing was established in 1995 for example, and others quickly followed in Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Canada, USA, and Germany [1]. A journal focusing on evidence-based nursing (EBN) was conceived in 1996 by the Canadian and UK centres, and to date has over 8,000 subscribers internationally. An editorial in this journal described evidence-based nursing as nursing which uses the best available research evidence alongside clinical expertise, patient preferences and the available resources [2]. This approach brings many challenges for nursing, not least: - a relatively short history of clinical research, therefore a dearth of good quality, clinically relevant research; - a lack of emphasis on how to use research in practice, in nurse training programmes; - a lack of access to research findings for clinical nurses; - a culture which often values experience above research based information. The UK Centre for EBN uses various strategies to address these challenges: 1] synthesizing research relevant to nursing practice by undertaking and updating systematic reviews of research; 2] training nurses and others in systematic review methodology; 3] collaborating in the production and dissemination of national clinical practice guidelines; 4] undertaking primary research in areas where research evidence is lacking (e.g. randomized trials of wound care interventions); 5] undertaking primary research into the use of information in nurse decision making and how this might be enhanced; 6] developing educational programmes for nurses in all aspects of evidence-based nursing. This paper will discuss our experiences in these broad areas, emphasizing the need for international collaboration in order to avoid duplication and maximize opportunities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:25:26Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:25:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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