2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153659
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prayer After Stroke – Its Relationship to Quality of Life
Abstract:
Prayer After Stroke – Its Relationship to Quality of Life
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Robinson-Smith, Gale, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Villanova University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: The purpose is to report results of a study that examined a subset of patients who participated in a longitudinal study of self-care self-efficacy, quality of life, and depression after stroke. Self-care self-efficacy was defined as the confidence a person has in his or her ability to perform relevant self-care activities. Design: The study used a qualitative design employing the long interview technique and content analysis (McCracken, 1988). Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Eight participants were selected from a larger sample of 63 patients by purposive sampling and were interviewed at home 1 year after a stroke. In the larger study, 37% of patients reported using prayer to improve confidence after stroke. The initial study examined stroke patients’ self-care self-efficacy, quality of life, and depression during inpatient rehabilitation and at 6 months post stroke in the home. Methods: The long interview method identified major and minor themes to construct a pattern of spiritual ways of coping after stroke. Six participants were women and two were men. Patients had been screened with the Mini-Mental Status Examination (Folstein, Anthony & McHugh, 1975). Findings: Three major themes were identified that described: Connecting to God, Ways of Praying Now, and Reaching Back to Early Family Life. Most participants used prayer as an essential factor in stroke recovery, however, they also experienced anger and difficulty with praying at times. Family members and friends were closely associated with prayer and faith in God through assistance offered that facilitated understanding of the meaning that stroke had for participants. Prayer was focused on regaining functional ability with participants recognizing that improvement required active responsibility on their part. Conclusions: Triangulation of data revealed a deeper understanding of how participants used prayer to improve confidence post stroke. Analysis of data showed the linkage of a supportive psychosocial intervention with the theoretical basis of the study. Implications: Nurses need to develop increased skill for communicating with patients who report the use of prayer post stroke. Exploring spiritual rituals with patients may build confidence and allow patients to transcend physical limitations thereby improving quality of life and decreasing depression after stroke.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrayer After Stroke – Its Relationship to Quality of Lifeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153659-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Prayer After Stroke &ndash; Its Relationship to Quality of Life</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Robinson-Smith, Gale, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Villanova University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gale.robinson-smith@villanova.</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose is to report results of a study that examined a subset of patients who participated in a longitudinal study of self-care self-efficacy, quality of life, and depression after stroke. Self-care self-efficacy was defined as the confidence a person has in his or her ability to perform relevant self-care activities. Design: The study used a qualitative design employing the long interview technique and content analysis (McCracken, 1988). Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Eight participants were selected from a larger sample of 63 patients by purposive sampling and were interviewed at home 1 year after a stroke. In the larger study, 37% of patients reported using prayer to improve confidence after stroke. The initial study examined stroke patients&rsquo; self-care self-efficacy, quality of life, and depression during inpatient rehabilitation and at 6 months post stroke in the home. Methods: The long interview method identified major and minor themes to construct a pattern of spiritual ways of coping after stroke. Six participants were women and two were men. Patients had been screened with the Mini-Mental Status Examination (Folstein, Anthony &amp; McHugh, 1975). Findings: Three major themes were identified that described: Connecting to God, Ways of Praying Now, and Reaching Back to Early Family Life. Most participants used prayer as an essential factor in stroke recovery, however, they also experienced anger and difficulty with praying at times. Family members and friends were closely associated with prayer and faith in God through assistance offered that facilitated understanding of the meaning that stroke had for participants. Prayer was focused on regaining functional ability with participants recognizing that improvement required active responsibility on their part. Conclusions: Triangulation of data revealed a deeper understanding of how participants used prayer to improve confidence post stroke. Analysis of data showed the linkage of a supportive psychosocial intervention with the theoretical basis of the study. Implications: Nurses need to develop increased skill for communicating with patients who report the use of prayer post stroke. Exploring spiritual rituals with patients may build confidence and allow patients to transcend physical limitations thereby improving quality of life and decreasing depression after stroke.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:25:29Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:25:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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