Relationship of maternal characteristics, feeding/nutrition choices and risk of infant obesity

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153660
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship of maternal characteristics, feeding/nutrition choices and risk of infant obesity
Abstract:
Relationship of maternal characteristics, feeding/nutrition choices and risk of infant obesity
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Sowan, Nancy
P.I. Institution Name:University of Vermont
Maternal characteristics have been implicated in the development of infant obesity, including feeding attitude, education, height, nonpregnant weight, and perception of ideal infant body type. Contradictory findings are reported in the literature concerning how infant nutrient intake patterns and feeding practices are related to infant growth and development of obesity. Method of feeding and timing of introduction of solid food have been associated with both increased and decreased risk of obesity. Purpose: Mothers play an important role in the early nutrition of their infants by how, when and what they feed their babies. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of maternal characteristics and nutrition and feeding practices on infant growth and the development of obesity. Design: Conducted in collaboration with a NIH-funded study of infant growth (1988-1996), this study employed repeated measures in a longitudinal, prospective design. An epidemiologic framework, Web of Causation, allowing for mapping of interrelationships among contributing factors, guided this study. Sample, Setting: Multiethnic subjects (N=631) from all socioeconomic classes were recruited at birth from 5 clinical sites in the Denver metropolitan area and followed longitudinally through age 14 months. Variables: Maternal variables included education level, socioeconomic status, marital status, level of stress, usual weight, pregnancy weight gain, age, and prenatal smoking. Nutritional variables included fat, iron and protein intake, caloric adequacy, and judgment of overall nutritional adequacy. Feeding practice variables included age when solid food was introduced and method of feeding (i.e., breast feeding, bottle feeding, combination breast-bottle feeding). Methods: Anthropometric measures were obtained monthly and data were collected at 1, 4, 7, 10, and 14 months of age during home visits. Nutritional and feeding practice data were collected using a detailed nutritional history and then translated into specific measures of nutritional intake and adequacy. Mothers were asked to complete Demographic and Perinatal Data Questionnaires, and a modified version of Holmes and Rahe Recent Life Change Questionnaire. Nonparametric, bivariate, and multivariate techniques were used to explore the interrelatedness of maternal characteristics; nutritional and feeding practice variables for risk of obesity. Findings: Maternal characteristics predictive of obesity varied across age and included mother’s usual nonpregnant weight, pregnancy weight gain, age, smoking during pregnancy, and marital status. Feeding practice variables predictive of obesity varied across age as well, and included being breastfed in early months, combination breast-bottle fed in later months, and having solids introduced earlier. Nutritional variables predictive of obesity included caloric intake and fat in the diet. Conclusions: The findings of this study indicate that nutritional and feeding practice variables and maternal characteristics amenable to change (i.e., method of feeding, caloric intake, fat intake, age of introduction of solid food, maternal weight and weight gain, maternal smoking) play a significant role in the risk of obesity. The findings in this research have produced insight into the effect of a variety of choices made by mothers about infant nutritional and feeding practices and their influence on the risk of early obesity. Implications: Nurses are in key positions to assess infants and their families for significant risk factors of obesity. Knowing about the risk factors of early infant obesity offers the possibility of identifying obesity as it develops and at points where simple changes in infant care practices could make a significant impact.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship of maternal characteristics, feeding/nutrition choices and risk of infant obesityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153660-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship of maternal characteristics, feeding/nutrition choices and risk of infant obesity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sowan, Nancy</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Vermont</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nsowan@zoo.uvm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Maternal characteristics have been implicated in the development of infant obesity, including feeding attitude, education, height, nonpregnant weight, and perception of ideal infant body type. Contradictory findings are reported in the literature concerning how infant nutrient intake patterns and feeding practices are related to infant growth and development of obesity. Method of feeding and timing of introduction of solid food have been associated with both increased and decreased risk of obesity. Purpose: Mothers play an important role in the early nutrition of their infants by how, when and what they feed their babies. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of maternal characteristics and nutrition and feeding practices on infant growth and the development of obesity. Design: Conducted in collaboration with a NIH-funded study of infant growth (1988-1996), this study employed repeated measures in a longitudinal, prospective design. An epidemiologic framework, Web of Causation, allowing for mapping of interrelationships among contributing factors, guided this study. Sample, Setting: Multiethnic subjects (N=631) from all socioeconomic classes were recruited at birth from 5 clinical sites in the Denver metropolitan area and followed longitudinally through age 14 months. Variables: Maternal variables included education level, socioeconomic status, marital status, level of stress, usual weight, pregnancy weight gain, age, and prenatal smoking. Nutritional variables included fat, iron and protein intake, caloric adequacy, and judgment of overall nutritional adequacy. Feeding practice variables included age when solid food was introduced and method of feeding (i.e., breast feeding, bottle feeding, combination breast-bottle feeding). Methods: Anthropometric measures were obtained monthly and data were collected at 1, 4, 7, 10, and 14 months of age during home visits. Nutritional and feeding practice data were collected using a detailed nutritional history and then translated into specific measures of nutritional intake and adequacy. Mothers were asked to complete Demographic and Perinatal Data Questionnaires, and a modified version of Holmes and Rahe Recent Life Change Questionnaire. Nonparametric, bivariate, and multivariate techniques were used to explore the interrelatedness of maternal characteristics; nutritional and feeding practice variables for risk of obesity. Findings: Maternal characteristics predictive of obesity varied across age and included mother&rsquo;s usual nonpregnant weight, pregnancy weight gain, age, smoking during pregnancy, and marital status. Feeding practice variables predictive of obesity varied across age as well, and included being breastfed in early months, combination breast-bottle fed in later months, and having solids introduced earlier. Nutritional variables predictive of obesity included caloric intake and fat in the diet. Conclusions: The findings of this study indicate that nutritional and feeding practice variables and maternal characteristics amenable to change (i.e., method of feeding, caloric intake, fat intake, age of introduction of solid food, maternal weight and weight gain, maternal smoking) play a significant role in the risk of obesity. The findings in this research have produced insight into the effect of a variety of choices made by mothers about infant nutritional and feeding practices and their influence on the risk of early obesity. Implications: Nurses are in key positions to assess infants and their families for significant risk factors of obesity. Knowing about the risk factors of early infant obesity offers the possibility of identifying obesity as it develops and at points where simple changes in infant care practices could make a significant impact.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:25:31Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:25:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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