Information, Evidence And Utility In Clinical Decision Making By UK Acute Care Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153662
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Information, Evidence And Utility In Clinical Decision Making By UK Acute Care Nurses
Abstract:
Information, Evidence And Utility In Clinical Decision Making By UK Acute Care Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Thompson, Carl
P.I. Institution Name:University of York
Objective: to explore and describe the characteristics of research information sources seen as useful by acute care nurse decision makers. Design: Multiple case site. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: >130 UK acute care nurses, data collected over two and half years (finished April 2000). Concept or Variables Studied: research utilization (in the context of clinical decision making). Methods: Mixed methods: including i) Theoretical sampling of nurses, ii) 108 in depth interviews, 180 hours of non-participant observation and documentary analysis of >4000 documents. iii) Q methodological modeling of shared subjectivities and regression modeling to identify significant demographic characteristics of nurses defining perspectives on the usefulness of research knowledge sources for clinical decision-making. iv) grounded theorizing based on triangulated cross case-analysis. Findings: four sets of shared values when considering whether a mode of delivering research information was useful or not: a) A desire for guidance or prescription: this was most often in the form of local guidelines and protocols; b) The overwhelming utility of experience-rich modes of information: a perspective most commonly shared by graduates; c) Structurally supported-experiential: the role of the managerial or R&D ‘machinery’ of the hospital (practice development teams, clinical audit departments) in mediating the messages and forms of information used by nurses and the associated ‘translation’ role into a language understood by practitioners; d) Scientific, research or technology derived: in which information technologies (such as on-line databases) begin to have an impact on the clinical decisions of nurses. Interestingly, a stance that was negatively associated with lengthy clinical experience in a single clinical domain. Conclusions: resources most often ‘stockpiled’ and heralded as indicators of a positive research culture such as local information files, textbooks and journals were those least likely to be useful in helping solve clinical problems. Prescriptive and human modes of information and knowledge transfer are the most clinically useful. Implications: The paper reveals that the current emphasis on stockpiling significant amounts of (but largely redundant) information sources is misguided. Either nurses should develop the skills that would allow them to (rapidly) make sense of research information - its validity, results and implications for patients - or we should reappraise the ways in which we approach the management and dissemination of research based information. This could take the form of a greater onus on developing the ‘translation’ function of key human sources such as clinical nurse specialists or consultants.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInformation, Evidence And Utility In Clinical Decision Making By UK Acute Care Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153662-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Information, Evidence And Utility In Clinical Decision Making By UK Acute Care Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thompson, Carl</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of York</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cat4@york.ac.uk</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: to explore and describe the characteristics of research information sources seen as useful by acute care nurse decision makers. Design: Multiple case site. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: &gt;130 UK acute care nurses, data collected over two and half years (finished April 2000). Concept or Variables Studied: research utilization (in the context of clinical decision making). Methods: Mixed methods: including i) Theoretical sampling of nurses, ii) 108 in depth interviews, 180 hours of non-participant observation and documentary analysis of &gt;4000 documents. iii) Q methodological modeling of shared subjectivities and regression modeling to identify significant demographic characteristics of nurses defining perspectives on the usefulness of research knowledge sources for clinical decision-making. iv) grounded theorizing based on triangulated cross case-analysis. Findings: four sets of shared values when considering whether a mode of delivering research information was useful or not: a) A desire for guidance or prescription: this was most often in the form of local guidelines and protocols; b) The overwhelming utility of experience-rich modes of information: a perspective most commonly shared by graduates; c) Structurally supported-experiential: the role of the managerial or R&amp;D &lsquo;machinery&rsquo; of the hospital (practice development teams, clinical audit departments) in mediating the messages and forms of information used by nurses and the associated &lsquo;translation&rsquo; role into a language understood by practitioners; d) Scientific, research or technology derived: in which information technologies (such as on-line databases) begin to have an impact on the clinical decisions of nurses. Interestingly, a stance that was negatively associated with lengthy clinical experience in a single clinical domain. Conclusions: resources most often &lsquo;stockpiled&rsquo; and heralded as indicators of a positive research culture such as local information files, textbooks and journals were those least likely to be useful in helping solve clinical problems. Prescriptive and human modes of information and knowledge transfer are the most clinically useful. Implications: The paper reveals that the current emphasis on stockpiling significant amounts of (but largely redundant) information sources is misguided. Either nurses should develop the skills that would allow them to (rapidly) make sense of research information - its validity, results and implications for patients - or we should reappraise the ways in which we approach the management and dissemination of research based information. This could take the form of a greater onus on developing the &lsquo;translation&rsquo; function of key human sources such as clinical nurse specialists or consultants.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:25:36Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:25:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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