A Moving Experience: Behavioral Changes in Psychiatric Patients During Hospital Relocation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153664
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Moving Experience: Behavioral Changes in Psychiatric Patients During Hospital Relocation
Abstract:
A Moving Experience: Behavioral Changes in Psychiatric Patients During Hospital Relocation
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Ward, Karen
P.I. Institution Name:Middle Tennessee State University
Objective: Relocation stress syndrome has been identified as a nursing diagnosis (Wilkinson, 2000). The purpose of this study was to determine whether planned interventions by the staff at a psychiatric facility moving from old buildings and grounds to a new location could modify the expected stress response in their patients. Design: This study was a non-experimental, longitudinal, panel design with pre and post move behavioral measures. Population, Sample, Setting: Long-term psychiatric patients were represented in this study. The convenience sample consisted of 32 hospitalized patients from a large state hospital that was relocating. The majority of the patients carried a diagnosis of psychosis (66%, n=21), the remaining being diagnosed with organicity (22%, n=7) and mood disorder (12%, n=4). Their time in hospital ranged from 4 months to slightly over 22 years; average time equaling 4.7 years. Variables Studied: 1. Patients’ behavioral demonstration of potential change induced stress as measured by scores on the NOSIE, 2. Gender, 3. Psychiatric diagnosis. Methods: The NOSIE was used to measure patient behaviors for a period of 16 consecutive weeks. Staff members with demonstrated reliability using the instrument completed the NOISE. The move occurred during week 6 of the study period. Five units of the hospital randomly selected subjects. One unit did not begin collecting data until week 2; another ceased collecting after week 12. Therefore weeks 2 through 5 and 7 through 12 were used for the analysis; week 6 (move week) was excluded. Findings: Raw scores on the NOSIE ranged from 24 to 178. Simple mean scores for pre and post move were 116.67 and 104.96, respectively. A paired samples test revealed a significant difference (p=.001) in the two means. Gender did not contribute significantly to any change in scores. Tests of within-subjects effects revealed significant (p=00 to p=.02) changes during the weeks of the study. The greatest changes occurred during the weeks surrounding the move. Conclusions: Overall, relocation to the new facility had a detrimental effect on the population studied based on the scores on the NOSIE and this sample. Despite the fact that all subjects received certain interventions designed to promote a smooth transition, many of them scored lower on the NOSIE after the move than they did before. Clearly, the interventions were not enough to prevent this deterioration. However, it is possible that there would have been an even greater decrease in scores without such support. Additionally, some of the subjects, particularly those with organicity, might have been at a point in their illness when exacerbation would have occurred regardless of outside circumstances. In contrast to the statistical results, certain, individual patients scored higher after the move, others’ scores dipped and then began an upward progression in the weeks after the move. Implications: Findings in this study support previous evidence that moves are difficult for most individuals, especially those with compromised situations (Lander, Brazil, & Ladrigan, 1997; Brugler, Titus, & Nypaver, 1993; Bellin, 1990). Further analysis of the data can investigate the sub-scales of the NOSIE. If the sub-scale data provide more information, interventions may be able to target these specific dimensions of behavior. Research looking at the effects of staff interactions and innovative interventions on relocation stress is suggested.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Moving Experience: Behavioral Changes in Psychiatric Patients During Hospital Relocationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153664-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Moving Experience: Behavioral Changes in Psychiatric Patients During Hospital Relocation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ward, Karen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Middle Tennessee State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kward@mtsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Relocation stress syndrome has been identified as a nursing diagnosis (Wilkinson, 2000). The purpose of this study was to determine whether planned interventions by the staff at a psychiatric facility moving from old buildings and grounds to a new location could modify the expected stress response in their patients. Design: This study was a non-experimental, longitudinal, panel design with pre and post move behavioral measures. Population, Sample, Setting: Long-term psychiatric patients were represented in this study. The convenience sample consisted of 32 hospitalized patients from a large state hospital that was relocating. The majority of the patients carried a diagnosis of psychosis (66%, n=21), the remaining being diagnosed with organicity (22%, n=7) and mood disorder (12%, n=4). Their time in hospital ranged from 4 months to slightly over 22 years; average time equaling 4.7 years. Variables Studied: 1. Patients&rsquo; behavioral demonstration of potential change induced stress as measured by scores on the NOSIE, 2. Gender, 3. Psychiatric diagnosis. Methods: The NOSIE was used to measure patient behaviors for a period of 16 consecutive weeks. Staff members with demonstrated reliability using the instrument completed the NOISE. The move occurred during week 6 of the study period. Five units of the hospital randomly selected subjects. One unit did not begin collecting data until week 2; another ceased collecting after week 12. Therefore weeks 2 through 5 and 7 through 12 were used for the analysis; week 6 (move week) was excluded. Findings: Raw scores on the NOSIE ranged from 24 to 178. Simple mean scores for pre and post move were 116.67 and 104.96, respectively. A paired samples test revealed a significant difference (p=.001) in the two means. Gender did not contribute significantly to any change in scores. Tests of within-subjects effects revealed significant (p=00 to p=.02) changes during the weeks of the study. The greatest changes occurred during the weeks surrounding the move. Conclusions: Overall, relocation to the new facility had a detrimental effect on the population studied based on the scores on the NOSIE and this sample. Despite the fact that all subjects received certain interventions designed to promote a smooth transition, many of them scored lower on the NOSIE after the move than they did before. Clearly, the interventions were not enough to prevent this deterioration. However, it is possible that there would have been an even greater decrease in scores without such support. Additionally, some of the subjects, particularly those with organicity, might have been at a point in their illness when exacerbation would have occurred regardless of outside circumstances. In contrast to the statistical results, certain, individual patients scored higher after the move, others&rsquo; scores dipped and then began an upward progression in the weeks after the move. Implications: Findings in this study support previous evidence that moves are difficult for most individuals, especially those with compromised situations (Lander, Brazil, &amp; Ladrigan, 1997; Brugler, Titus, &amp; Nypaver, 1993; Bellin, 1990). Further analysis of the data can investigate the sub-scales of the NOSIE. If the sub-scale data provide more information, interventions may be able to target these specific dimensions of behavior. Research looking at the effects of staff interactions and innovative interventions on relocation stress is suggested.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:25:41Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:25:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.