Caregiving demands, stress, and coping of family caregivers of patients with cerebrovascular disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153665
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caregiving demands, stress, and coping of family caregivers of patients with cerebrovascular disease
Abstract:
Caregiving demands, stress, and coping of family caregivers of patients with cerebrovascular disease
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Wongjunlongsin, Suwaluk
P.I. Institution Name:Mahidol University
Objective: The purposes of this study were to explore caregiving demands, stress, and coping strategies of family caregivers of patients with cerebrovascular disease (CVD). Design: A descriptive design was used. The Lazarus and Folkman’s stress, appraisal, and coping theory was used to guide this study. Population Sample, Setting, Years: A convenience sample of 100 family caregivers who lived with, and provided the majority of care to patients with CVD, was obtained from the out-patient clinic at Prasat Neurological Hospital Institute from February to April 30, 1999. The inclusion criteria were: a) primary caregiver who provide direct care to patient with CVD for at least 1 month at home; b) aged 15 years and over and able to communicate in the Thai language; if the caregivers’ age was more than 60, their cognitive status score based on a Set test must be 25 and over; and c) willingness to participate in the study. Caregivers who appraised no stress from providing care were excluded from this study. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Caregiving demands, stress, and coping were the variables of the study. Methods: The eligible subjects were interviewed concerning the prevalence of patients’ demands for help with activities of daily living and behavioral problems in the home setting, the subjective stressfulness of each activity and problem, and caregivers’ coping for managing the caregiving demands that are appraised as stressful. Findings: Results of the study revealed that the caregivers reported their caregiving demands included an average of 6.7 disabilities on the BAI, 4.6 disabilities on the CAI, and 12.4 behavior problems. The caregivers appraised low level of stress from providing care for BAI and CAI disabilities, and low to moderate stress from dealing with behavior problems. All caregivers used a combination of coping strategies from three coping subscales: confrontive, palliative, and emotive coping. The proportion of coping strategies the caregivers used from the highest to the lowest was confrontive, palliative and emotive strategies. Implications: The results can be used to plan specific nursing interventions for the family caregivers of CVD patients. Further research should be conducted nursing interventions for caregiver of CVD patients by using the finding from this study as baseline information. Furthermore, 13 caregivers who were excluded from this study because of no stress from providing care, highlight an interesting point that should be studied.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaregiving demands, stress, and coping of family caregivers of patients with cerebrovascular diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153665-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Caregiving demands, stress, and coping of family caregivers of patients with cerebrovascular disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wongjunlongsin, Suwaluk</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mahidol University</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purposes of this study were to explore caregiving demands, stress, and coping strategies of family caregivers of patients with cerebrovascular disease (CVD). Design: A descriptive design was used. The Lazarus and Folkman&rsquo;s stress, appraisal, and coping theory was used to guide this study. Population Sample, Setting, Years: A convenience sample of 100 family caregivers who lived with, and provided the majority of care to patients with CVD, was obtained from the out-patient clinic at Prasat Neurological Hospital Institute from February to April 30, 1999. The inclusion criteria were: a) primary caregiver who provide direct care to patient with CVD for at least 1 month at home; b) aged 15 years and over and able to communicate in the Thai language; if the caregivers&rsquo; age was more than 60, their cognitive status score based on a Set test must be 25 and over; and c) willingness to participate in the study. Caregivers who appraised no stress from providing care were excluded from this study. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Caregiving demands, stress, and coping were the variables of the study. Methods: The eligible subjects were interviewed concerning the prevalence of patients&rsquo; demands for help with activities of daily living and behavioral problems in the home setting, the subjective stressfulness of each activity and problem, and caregivers&rsquo; coping for managing the caregiving demands that are appraised as stressful. Findings: Results of the study revealed that the caregivers reported their caregiving demands included an average of 6.7 disabilities on the BAI, 4.6 disabilities on the CAI, and 12.4 behavior problems. The caregivers appraised low level of stress from providing care for BAI and CAI disabilities, and low to moderate stress from dealing with behavior problems. All caregivers used a combination of coping strategies from three coping subscales: confrontive, palliative, and emotive coping. The proportion of coping strategies the caregivers used from the highest to the lowest was confrontive, palliative and emotive strategies. Implications: The results can be used to plan specific nursing interventions for the family caregivers of CVD patients. Further research should be conducted nursing interventions for caregiver of CVD patients by using the finding from this study as baseline information. Furthermore, 13 caregivers who were excluded from this study because of no stress from providing care, highlight an interesting point that should be studied.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:25:43Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:25:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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