2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153666
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depressive Symptoms and Self-Care in Pregnant Women with HIV in Thailand
Abstract:
Depressive Symptoms and Self-Care in Pregnant Women with HIV in Thailand
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Boonpongmanee, Chayanin
P.I. Institution Name:Prince of Songkla University
Depressive Symptoms and Self-Care in Pregnant Women with HIV in Thailand Objective: To examine the prevalence of depressive symptoms and the relationship of demographic and personal characteristics to depressive symptoms and prenatal self-care among pregnant women with HIV and a control group. Design: The study used a comparative, descriptive design to compare two groups of pregnant women. Samples and Settings: The convenience sample of 79 pregnant women who were HIV-positive and 77 who were HIV-negative were recruited at two antenatal clinics in Bangkok and Nonthaburi, Thailand. Two HIV-infected pregnant women refused to participate in the study. Mean age of subjects was 27.50 (SD=5.5). Most of the women were married (92.8%). More than half (65%) had education less that high school. Nearly half (49%) reported financial problems. There was high incidence of unplanned pregnancy (47%). Half entered prenatal care late at the third trimester. More than half (59.8%) were multiparas. Data were collected between May and August, 2000. Variables and Outcome Measures: Depressive symptoms were assessed using 15-item affective subscale of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale and prenatal self-care was measured using a 41-item Hart Prenatal Care Actions Scale. Demographic and personal characteristics were recorded. Methods: Data were obtained by face-to-face interview at a private room. Independent sample t-tests and one-way factorial analysis of variance were used to test for mean differences in depressive symptoms and prenatal self-care related to demographic and personal characteristics. Post-hoc tests were used to identify which groups had significantly different means from which others. Pearson product moment correlations were used to determine significant relationships between depressive symptoms, prenatal self-care and age, income, number of children, knowledge related to HIV, gestational age, and time since HIV diagnosis. Findings: Pregnant women with HIV reported significantly higher level of depressive symptoms and lower used prenatal self-care than those without HIV. Using the affect CES-D subscale cut-offs (>23), 36% of the women with HIV and 12% of the women without HIV experienced significant depressive symptoms. Seventy-four percent of HIV-infected women and thirty-eight percent of non HIV-infected women reported depressive scores higher than 16 which is indicative of the possible presence of depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms and prenatal self-care were significantly related to HIV status, income, financial problems, education, and marital status. The women who wanted their pregnancies reported significantly less frequency of depressive symptoms and performed greater self-care than the women who did not want their pregnancies. Both depressive symptoms and prenatal self-care were not related to maternal age, number of children, gestational age, planned pregnancy, parity, trimester, knowledge related to HIV, and time since HIV diagnosis. Conclusion: Not only HIV status but also the challenging personal factors were related to frequency and level of depressive symptoms and the number of self-care practices during pregnancy. Implication: Women with a positive HIV status need to be routinely assessed for depressive symptoms. Regardless HIV status, prevalence of depressive symptoms was high in pregnant women. Therefore, it appears that all Thai pregnant women should be detected for clinical depression. However, since pregnancy is often accompanied by a number of physical symptoms that are also often associated with depression, antepartum depression should be evaluated by a standard assessment tool that excludes items of somatic complaints. This helps reduce chances of overdiagnosing depression in population who might have physical symptoms. Thus, short form of reliable instrument should be used to screen depression at antenatal clinics so that interventions can be delivered. Referral to appropriate health services is recommended. Great attention should be paid to demographic and personal factors in prenatal care assessment. Future research needs to examine the factors that alleviate depressive symptoms and promote prenatal self-care practices.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepressive Symptoms and Self-Care in Pregnant Women with HIV in Thailanden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153666-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Depressive Symptoms and Self-Care in Pregnant Women with HIV in Thailand</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Boonpongmanee, Chayanin</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Prince of Songkla University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">csaehan@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Depressive Symptoms and Self-Care in Pregnant Women with HIV in Thailand Objective: To examine the prevalence of depressive symptoms and the relationship of demographic and personal characteristics to depressive symptoms and prenatal self-care among pregnant women with HIV and a control group. Design: The study used a comparative, descriptive design to compare two groups of pregnant women. Samples and Settings: The convenience sample of 79 pregnant women who were HIV-positive and 77 who were HIV-negative were recruited at two antenatal clinics in Bangkok and Nonthaburi, Thailand. Two HIV-infected pregnant women refused to participate in the study. Mean age of subjects was 27.50 (SD=5.5). Most of the women were married (92.8%). More than half (65%) had education less that high school. Nearly half (49%) reported financial problems. There was high incidence of unplanned pregnancy (47%). Half entered prenatal care late at the third trimester. More than half (59.8%) were multiparas. Data were collected between May and August, 2000. Variables and Outcome Measures: Depressive symptoms were assessed using 15-item affective subscale of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale and prenatal self-care was measured using a 41-item Hart Prenatal Care Actions Scale. Demographic and personal characteristics were recorded. Methods: Data were obtained by face-to-face interview at a private room. Independent sample t-tests and one-way factorial analysis of variance were used to test for mean differences in depressive symptoms and prenatal self-care related to demographic and personal characteristics. Post-hoc tests were used to identify which groups had significantly different means from which others. Pearson product moment correlations were used to determine significant relationships between depressive symptoms, prenatal self-care and age, income, number of children, knowledge related to HIV, gestational age, and time since HIV diagnosis. Findings: Pregnant women with HIV reported significantly higher level of depressive symptoms and lower used prenatal self-care than those without HIV. Using the affect CES-D subscale cut-offs (&gt;23), 36% of the women with HIV and 12% of the women without HIV experienced significant depressive symptoms. Seventy-four percent of HIV-infected women and thirty-eight percent of non HIV-infected women reported depressive scores higher than 16 which is indicative of the possible presence of depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms and prenatal self-care were significantly related to HIV status, income, financial problems, education, and marital status. The women who wanted their pregnancies reported significantly less frequency of depressive symptoms and performed greater self-care than the women who did not want their pregnancies. Both depressive symptoms and prenatal self-care were not related to maternal age, number of children, gestational age, planned pregnancy, parity, trimester, knowledge related to HIV, and time since HIV diagnosis. Conclusion: Not only HIV status but also the challenging personal factors were related to frequency and level of depressive symptoms and the number of self-care practices during pregnancy. Implication: Women with a positive HIV status need to be routinely assessed for depressive symptoms. Regardless HIV status, prevalence of depressive symptoms was high in pregnant women. Therefore, it appears that all Thai pregnant women should be detected for clinical depression. However, since pregnancy is often accompanied by a number of physical symptoms that are also often associated with depression, antepartum depression should be evaluated by a standard assessment tool that excludes items of somatic complaints. This helps reduce chances of overdiagnosing depression in population who might have physical symptoms. Thus, short form of reliable instrument should be used to screen depression at antenatal clinics so that interventions can be delivered. Referral to appropriate health services is recommended. Great attention should be paid to demographic and personal factors in prenatal care assessment. Future research needs to examine the factors that alleviate depressive symptoms and promote prenatal self-care practices.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:25:46Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:25:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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