2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153669
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessment and Meaning of Nursing Faculty's Teaching-Learning Style
Abstract:
Assessment and Meaning of Nursing Faculty's Teaching-Learning Style
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Schaefer, Karen, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Temple University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: The teacher has an integral role in creating a learning environment that supports the development of critical thinking. Assuming that teaching style creates the environment, the purpose of this study was to describe the teaching style of a group of nursing faculty as either teacheror student-centered. Design: A descriptive design was used to achieve the study goals. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to strengthen the study findings. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Completed responses were received from 187 nursing faculty, for a return rate of 37.4%. The mean age of the sample was 50 range of 27 to 68); 95% of the faculty were female. They taught for a mean of 14 years (range of 1 to 35) and were engaged in clinical practice for a mean of 20.79 years (range of 2 to 42). Fifty five percent remain active in clinical practice. The most recent clinical activity was in 2001 while the most remote was 1985. Concept or Variables Studied: The Principles of Adult Learning Style (PALS) measures the frequency with which faculty members practice teaching-learning principles of adult learning theory. Items in the instrument are divided into seven factors: (a) Learner-centered activities, (b) personalizing instruction, (c) relating to experience, (d) assessing student needs, (e) climate building, (f) participation in the learning process and (g) flexibility for personal development. A total score and scores for each of the seven factors are calculated. Course syllabus and other teaching materials were examined from a randomly selected group of faculty for evidence of teaching style. The Demographic Questionnaire was used to determine the relationship of their philosophy of teaching-learning to their actual teaching style. Methods: One hundred baccalaureate nursing programs were randomly selected from a list of accredited BSN programs. A packet with five sets of instruments were mailed to the Director of the Program to distribute to 5 willing participants. Each packet contained a consent form, PALS, and a demographic questionnaire. A postcard was placed in one randomly selected packet of five sets requesting additional data that represented the individual's teaching style. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to analyze the data. Findings: The PALS score for the study population was 137 with a standard deviation of 16, which is consistent with a teacher-centered approach to instruction (37.4% response). Nursing faculty scored less than the standard mean in the following factors: (a) Learner-centered activities, (b) personalizing instruction, (c) climate building, and (d) participation in the learning process. In areas where nursing faculty scored greater than the standard mean score, (a) relating to experience, (b) assessing student needs and (c) flexibility for development, there was a one point or less difference from the standard mean score. The themes identified from the philosophies of teaching learning support the overall score indicating a preference for the teacher-centered style. Additional findings reveal that faculty members described a philosophy of nursing or integrated nursing into their philosophy of teaching-learning. The context in which empowerment and facilitate were used suggest that faculty members misinterpret or misunderstand these concepts. Barriers to implementing a student-centered approach included; academic structure, system problems, and an outcome versus process orientation. Conclusions: The teaching style of nursing faculty members in this study is predominantly teacher-centered. The inconsistency between the PALS factor scores and the analysis of the Philosophy of teaching-learning suggests dissonance between practice and beliefs. The responsibility of the teacher was evident in the Philosophy of teaching-learning but the process of learning was largely ignored. The tendency for some nursing faculty to approach teaching and learning as a nurse rather than as an educator might be adversely impacting the implementation of a student-centered learning environment. Implications: It is recommended that nursing faculty members receive assistance in moving from a traditional teacher-centered to a student-centered style of teaching. In addition, nursing faculty members may also need assistance in the transition from nurse to teacher. New faculty may need course in education. These courses could be selected based on their ability to (a) clarify difference between the teacher and learner; (b)examine student learning as the desired outcome of the teacher rather than teaching; and (c) explore the incorporation of a process orientation into nursing curricula rather than a strict outcomes focus. More funding is needed to examine issues that contribute to nursing faculty knowledge in developing a generation of advanced thinkers. Future studies should focus on the interaction between teaching style, critical thinking, and student outcomes such as State Board pass rates.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessment and Meaning of Nursing Faculty's Teaching-Learning Styleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153669-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessment and Meaning of Nursing Faculty's Teaching-Learning Style</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schaefer, Karen, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Temple University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kschae01@astro.temple.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The teacher has an integral role in creating a learning environment that supports the development of critical thinking. Assuming that teaching style creates the environment, the purpose of this study was to describe the teaching style of a group of nursing faculty as either teacheror student-centered. Design: A descriptive design was used to achieve the study goals. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to strengthen the study findings. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Completed responses were received from 187 nursing faculty, for a return rate of 37.4%. The mean age of the sample was 50 range of 27 to 68); 95% of the faculty were female. They taught for a mean of 14 years (range of 1 to 35) and were engaged in clinical practice for a mean of 20.79 years (range of 2 to 42). Fifty five percent remain active in clinical practice. The most recent clinical activity was in 2001 while the most remote was 1985. Concept or Variables Studied: The Principles of Adult Learning Style (PALS) measures the frequency with which faculty members practice teaching-learning principles of adult learning theory. Items in the instrument are divided into seven factors: (a) Learner-centered activities, (b) personalizing instruction, (c) relating to experience, (d) assessing student needs, (e) climate building, (f) participation in the learning process and (g) flexibility for personal development. A total score and scores for each of the seven factors are calculated. Course syllabus and other teaching materials were examined from a randomly selected group of faculty for evidence of teaching style. The Demographic Questionnaire was used to determine the relationship of their philosophy of teaching-learning to their actual teaching style. Methods: One hundred baccalaureate nursing programs were randomly selected from a list of accredited BSN programs. A packet with five sets of instruments were mailed to the Director of the Program to distribute to 5 willing participants. Each packet contained a consent form, PALS, and a demographic questionnaire. A postcard was placed in one randomly selected packet of five sets requesting additional data that represented the individual's teaching style. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to analyze the data. Findings: The PALS score for the study population was 137 with a standard deviation of 16, which is consistent with a teacher-centered approach to instruction (37.4% response). Nursing faculty scored less than the standard mean in the following factors: (a) Learner-centered activities, (b) personalizing instruction, (c) climate building, and (d) participation in the learning process. In areas where nursing faculty scored greater than the standard mean score, (a) relating to experience, (b) assessing student needs and (c) flexibility for development, there was a one point or less difference from the standard mean score. The themes identified from the philosophies of teaching learning support the overall score indicating a preference for the teacher-centered style. Additional findings reveal that faculty members described a philosophy of nursing or integrated nursing into their philosophy of teaching-learning. The context in which empowerment and facilitate were used suggest that faculty members misinterpret or misunderstand these concepts. Barriers to implementing a student-centered approach included; academic structure, system problems, and an outcome versus process orientation. Conclusions: The teaching style of nursing faculty members in this study is predominantly teacher-centered. The inconsistency between the PALS factor scores and the analysis of the Philosophy of teaching-learning suggests dissonance between practice and beliefs. The responsibility of the teacher was evident in the Philosophy of teaching-learning but the process of learning was largely ignored. The tendency for some nursing faculty to approach teaching and learning as a nurse rather than as an educator might be adversely impacting the implementation of a student-centered learning environment. Implications: It is recommended that nursing faculty members receive assistance in moving from a traditional teacher-centered to a student-centered style of teaching. In addition, nursing faculty members may also need assistance in the transition from nurse to teacher. New faculty may need course in education. These courses could be selected based on their ability to (a) clarify difference between the teacher and learner; (b)examine student learning as the desired outcome of the teacher rather than teaching; and (c) explore the incorporation of a process orientation into nursing curricula rather than a strict outcomes focus. More funding is needed to examine issues that contribute to nursing faculty knowledge in developing a generation of advanced thinkers. Future studies should focus on the interaction between teaching style, critical thinking, and student outcomes such as State Board pass rates.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:25:53Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:25:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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