Perceived Social Support: Dimensions of Social Interaction among Sober Female Participants in Alcoholics Anonymous

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153672
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceived Social Support: Dimensions of Social Interaction among Sober Female Participants in Alcoholics Anonymous
Abstract:
Perceived Social Support: Dimensions of Social Interaction among Sober Female Participants in Alcoholics Anonymous
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Rush, Mary
P.I. Institution Name:LMG Programs, Inc.
Title:Vice President
Objective: Families, friends, therapists, Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) sponsors, and AA groups comprised the proximate milieu of significant influential dimensions of successful sobriety in this study's sample of sober women. Research has demonstrated that of all those who enter AA, only ten percent remain after a year. The purpose of this study was to examine the mutual interaction and influence between sober women and their environment both in the community and in AA through an analyses of specific social factors that contributed to this group of women's ongoing participation in AA and continuous sobriety. Study Design: Based on the Science of Unitary Human Beings, this exploratory, correlational study was designed to explore relations among subscales of total perceived social support in a sample of sober female participants in AA.The subscales of total perceived social support consist of perceived personal social support and perceived group social support. Each subscale has five dimensions: availability; emotional support; practical support; reciprocity; and event-related support. An analysis was performed to determine which of the dimensions of personal social support was the strongest contributor to its total variance. A second analysis was performed to determine which of the dimensions of total perceived social support was the strongest contributor to its total variance. A third analysis was performed to evaluate if there was a statistically significant difference between those women who had an AA sponsor and those who did not in overall perceived social support as well as its subscales, personal and group social support. A fourth analysis was performed to determine which of the dimensions of perceived group social support was the strongest contributor to its variance. These ancillary research questions were answered using stepwise multiple regressions and a t-test. This study was based on secondary analyses of data that were collected as part of the author's research of variables that facilitate women's ongoing participation in Alcoholics Anonymous. Population and Sample: The sample was comprised of 125 sober female participants in AA, with a self-reported length of sobriety of at least one year, and who resided in cities and towns in southwestern New England. Active participation was defined as attending at least one AA meeting weekly. Setting and Years: The settings were open AA meetings in southwestern New England during the years of 1994-1995. Variables Studied Together: The dimensions of personal and group-related perceived social support, subscales of the Social Support Network Inventory (SSNI)(availability; emotional support; practical support; reciprocity; and event-related support), were examined for their unique contribution to both the variances of personal and group perceived social support. These dimensions were also examined for their unique contribution to the total variance of perceived social support. The relation between having a sponsor and its contribution to overall perceived social support and its subscales, perceived personal support and perceived group social support, was also studied. Methods: The sample was recruited through random snowball or "network" sampling. After a brief explanation, those who wished to participate in the study received the study packet directly from the researcher either before or after AA meetings that were open to the general public. Using network or "snowball" sampling, members of the AA network also volunteered to seek participants at meetings not accessible to the researcher such as "gay" meetings that are not traditionally open to the general public. Findings: Step-wise multiple regressions demonstrated that availability was the strongest contributor to the total variance of both personal and total perceived social support. T-tests also demonstrated that those women who had a sponsor scored significantly higher in overall perceived social support as well as perceived personal support. A step-wise multiple regression analysis showed that reciprocity was the strongest contributor to the total variance of group social support. Implications for Practice: Bridging the gap between clinical research and clinical practice provides challenges not only to researchers but to clinicians. This study's theory-driven, research-based findings provide to all nurses, particularly psychiatric nurses, an enhanced understanding of how and for whom AA works. Maintenance of sobriety requires continuous active support through a community of family, peers, and professionals. The importance of such a supportive environment, in continuous sobriety, was demonstrated. Conclusions: In making decisions and recommendations about care delivery to individuals or groups seeking sobriety, this knowledge should be utilized in order to facilitate sobriety and those relationships which must become an integral part of its contingency management. Through collaborative effort and research-based practice, quality of care and appropriateness of referrals to AA will be enhanced.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceived Social Support: Dimensions of Social Interaction among Sober Female Participants in Alcoholics Anonymousen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153672-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceived Social Support: Dimensions of Social Interaction among Sober Female Participants in Alcoholics Anonymous</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rush, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">LMG Programs, Inc.</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Vice President</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mrush90677@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Families, friends, therapists, Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) sponsors, and AA groups comprised the proximate milieu of significant influential dimensions of successful sobriety in this study's sample of sober women. Research has demonstrated that of all those who enter AA, only ten percent remain after a year. The purpose of this study was to examine the mutual interaction and influence between sober women and their environment both in the community and in AA through an analyses of specific social factors that contributed to this group of women's ongoing participation in AA and continuous sobriety. Study Design: Based on the Science of Unitary Human Beings, this exploratory, correlational study was designed to explore relations among subscales of total perceived social support in a sample of sober female participants in AA.The subscales of total perceived social support consist of perceived personal social support and perceived group social support. Each subscale has five dimensions: availability; emotional support; practical support; reciprocity; and event-related support. An analysis was performed to determine which of the dimensions of personal social support was the strongest contributor to its total variance. A second analysis was performed to determine which of the dimensions of total perceived social support was the strongest contributor to its total variance. A third analysis was performed to evaluate if there was a statistically significant difference between those women who had an AA sponsor and those who did not in overall perceived social support as well as its subscales, personal and group social support. A fourth analysis was performed to determine which of the dimensions of perceived group social support was the strongest contributor to its variance. These ancillary research questions were answered using stepwise multiple regressions and a t-test. This study was based on secondary analyses of data that were collected as part of the author's research of variables that facilitate women's ongoing participation in Alcoholics Anonymous. Population and Sample: The sample was comprised of 125 sober female participants in AA, with a self-reported length of sobriety of at least one year, and who resided in cities and towns in southwestern New England. Active participation was defined as attending at least one AA meeting weekly. Setting and Years: The settings were open AA meetings in southwestern New England during the years of 1994-1995. Variables Studied Together: The dimensions of personal and group-related perceived social support, subscales of the Social Support Network Inventory (SSNI)(availability; emotional support; practical support; reciprocity; and event-related support), were examined for their unique contribution to both the variances of personal and group perceived social support. These dimensions were also examined for their unique contribution to the total variance of perceived social support. The relation between having a sponsor and its contribution to overall perceived social support and its subscales, perceived personal support and perceived group social support, was also studied. Methods: The sample was recruited through random snowball or &quot;network&quot; sampling. After a brief explanation, those who wished to participate in the study received the study packet directly from the researcher either before or after AA meetings that were open to the general public. Using network or &quot;snowball&quot; sampling, members of the AA network also volunteered to seek participants at meetings not accessible to the researcher such as &quot;gay&quot; meetings that are not traditionally open to the general public. Findings: Step-wise multiple regressions demonstrated that availability was the strongest contributor to the total variance of both personal and total perceived social support. T-tests also demonstrated that those women who had a sponsor scored significantly higher in overall perceived social support as well as perceived personal support. A step-wise multiple regression analysis showed that reciprocity was the strongest contributor to the total variance of group social support. Implications for Practice: Bridging the gap between clinical research and clinical practice provides challenges not only to researchers but to clinicians. This study's theory-driven, research-based findings provide to all nurses, particularly psychiatric nurses, an enhanced understanding of how and for whom AA works. Maintenance of sobriety requires continuous active support through a community of family, peers, and professionals. The importance of such a supportive environment, in continuous sobriety, was demonstrated. Conclusions: In making decisions and recommendations about care delivery to individuals or groups seeking sobriety, this knowledge should be utilized in order to facilitate sobriety and those relationships which must become an integral part of its contingency management. Through collaborative effort and research-based practice, quality of care and appropriateness of referrals to AA will be enhanced.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:26:01Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:26:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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