Buddhist Family Caregiving: A Phenomenological Study of Family Caregiving to the Seriously Mentally Ill in Thailand

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153675
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Buddhist Family Caregiving: A Phenomenological Study of Family Caregiving to the Seriously Mentally Ill in Thailand
Abstract:
Buddhist Family Caregiving: A Phenomenological Study of Family Caregiving to the Seriously Mentally Ill in Thailand
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Sethabouppha, Hunsa
P.I. Institution Name:Chiang Mai University
Family caregiving has been extensively investigated in the literature. However, the lived experiences from Thai Buddhist family caregivers' perspectives has not been as thoroughly documented. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to elicit information about Thai Buddhist caregiving from caregivers' perspectives in order to explore the meaning of the lived experiences of Thai Buddhist caregivers through posing the question: How do Thai Buddhist caregivers experience their daily lives when a family member is seriously mentally ill? Design, Population, Sample, Setting, Methods Following the phenomenological method described by Cohen, Kahn, and Steeves (2000), fifteen Thai Buddhist family caregivers to seriously mentally ill relatives living in northern Thailand provided in-depth descriptions of the typical, the worst, and the best days in their caregiving. Findings Results showed the presence of five major themes: caregiving is suffering, caregiving is Buddhist belief, caregiving is compassion, caregiving is management, and caregiving is acceptance. The caregiving is suffering theme emerged from the categories of physical burden, emotional distress, social problems, economic problems, and knowledge deficit. The theme of caregiving is Buddhist belief connected an understanding of caregiving with the beliefs in Karma, Boon (merit) and Babb (demerit), and Dharma (Buddhist teaching). Within the caregiving is compassion theme; Thai caregivers' descriptions of compassion were interpreted as caring and support. The categories of stress management, symptom management, and treatment management were represented by the theme of caregiving is management. The caregiving is acceptance theme emerged from the caregivers' perspectives that their relatives' illness was incurable and sickness is a natural part of living. Conclusions Thai caregivers practiced their Buddhist beliefs when caregiving, particularly (1) practicing Metta (caring) and Karuna (support) to generate compassion in caregiving, (2) practicing the Noble Eight Fold Path (the middle way) to create management in caregiving, and (3) practicing Ubekkha (equanimity) to promote acceptance in caregiving. Even though suffering from the problems posed by mental illness permeated their lives, Thai Buddhist caregivers were able to continue to maintain compassion, management, and acceptance in caregiving to their seriously mentally ill relatives. This study makes a unique contribution in that it presents the actual lived experience of Thai Buddhist caregivers and explicates the connection of Buddhist principles to sustaining caregiving to the seriously mentally ill. Implications Buddhist practice was found to help in sustaining caregiving, even in the face of suffering. These findings indicated the need to attend to and understand the nature of family caregiving associated with Buddhist practice. Clinicians should be sensitive to Buddhist beliefs in working with traditional Thai families, Thai immigrants, and the diverse groups around the world who practice Buddhism. Clinicians should be aware that when working with these populations, religious beliefs and practices deserve particular attention throughout the process of assessment and intervention. Therefore, a thorough understanding of Buddhist practices in Thai caregiving is imperative in order to include Buddhist practice in designing interventions for Thai families and other Buddhist cultures. Clinicians should always take into account relevant Buddhist principles in developing intervention programs, so as to promote quality caregiving and support the well being of Buddhist caregivers, the patients, and their support networks.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuddhist Family Caregiving: A Phenomenological Study of Family Caregiving to the Seriously Mentally Ill in Thailanden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153675-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Buddhist Family Caregiving: A Phenomenological Study of Family Caregiving to the Seriously Mentally Ill in Thailand</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sethabouppha, Hunsa</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Chiang Mai University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hunsa@mail.nurse.cmu.ac.th</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Family caregiving has been extensively investigated in the literature. However, the lived experiences from Thai Buddhist family caregivers' perspectives has not been as thoroughly documented. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to elicit information about Thai Buddhist caregiving from caregivers' perspectives in order to explore the meaning of the lived experiences of Thai Buddhist caregivers through posing the question: How do Thai Buddhist caregivers experience their daily lives when a family member is seriously mentally ill? Design, Population, Sample, Setting, Methods Following the phenomenological method described by Cohen, Kahn, and Steeves (2000), fifteen Thai Buddhist family caregivers to seriously mentally ill relatives living in northern Thailand provided in-depth descriptions of the typical, the worst, and the best days in their caregiving. Findings Results showed the presence of five major themes: caregiving is suffering, caregiving is Buddhist belief, caregiving is compassion, caregiving is management, and caregiving is acceptance. The caregiving is suffering theme emerged from the categories of physical burden, emotional distress, social problems, economic problems, and knowledge deficit. The theme of caregiving is Buddhist belief connected an understanding of caregiving with the beliefs in Karma, Boon (merit) and Babb (demerit), and Dharma (Buddhist teaching). Within the caregiving is compassion theme; Thai caregivers' descriptions of compassion were interpreted as caring and support. The categories of stress management, symptom management, and treatment management were represented by the theme of caregiving is management. The caregiving is acceptance theme emerged from the caregivers' perspectives that their relatives' illness was incurable and sickness is a natural part of living. Conclusions Thai caregivers practiced their Buddhist beliefs when caregiving, particularly (1) practicing Metta (caring) and Karuna (support) to generate compassion in caregiving, (2) practicing the Noble Eight Fold Path (the middle way) to create management in caregiving, and (3) practicing Ubekkha (equanimity) to promote acceptance in caregiving. Even though suffering from the problems posed by mental illness permeated their lives, Thai Buddhist caregivers were able to continue to maintain compassion, management, and acceptance in caregiving to their seriously mentally ill relatives. This study makes a unique contribution in that it presents the actual lived experience of Thai Buddhist caregivers and explicates the connection of Buddhist principles to sustaining caregiving to the seriously mentally ill. Implications Buddhist practice was found to help in sustaining caregiving, even in the face of suffering. These findings indicated the need to attend to and understand the nature of family caregiving associated with Buddhist practice. Clinicians should be sensitive to Buddhist beliefs in working with traditional Thai families, Thai immigrants, and the diverse groups around the world who practice Buddhism. Clinicians should be aware that when working with these populations, religious beliefs and practices deserve particular attention throughout the process of assessment and intervention. Therefore, a thorough understanding of Buddhist practices in Thai caregiving is imperative in order to include Buddhist practice in designing interventions for Thai families and other Buddhist cultures. Clinicians should always take into account relevant Buddhist principles in developing intervention programs, so as to promote quality caregiving and support the well being of Buddhist caregivers, the patients, and their support networks.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:26:09Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:26:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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