Is Vitamin A Supplementation Necessary for Children Age 6-60 Months in the Mid-Hills of Nepal?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153677
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is Vitamin A Supplementation Necessary for Children Age 6-60 Months in the Mid-Hills of Nepal?
Abstract:
Is Vitamin A Supplementation Necessary for Children Age 6-60 Months in the Mid-Hills of Nepal?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Grubesic, Ruth
P.I. Institution Name:Texas Women's University
Title:Assistant Clinical Professor
Objective: To compare the prevalence of health outcomes (vitamin A deficiency disease, malnutrition, diarrhea and acute respiratory infection) by supplementation status and other risk factors in two groups of children age 6-60 months, (those supplemented with 100,000-200,000 IU of vitamin A capsules and those children not supplemented). Design: A supplemented intervention vs. unsupplemented comparison study design with two independent samples compared these two groups of children. A third group emerged from the unsupplemented group; those children in the unsupplemented group who received a vitamin A capsule once during the polio National Immunization Day campaign (polio NID) in November 1999. Subjects: Children age 6-60 months from a sample of children in two districts of Nepal (during the summer of 2000), one group that received vitamin A capsule distribution in the past 6 months and another group that did not receive capsule distribution or only received one capsule eight months prior to data collection. Variables: Exposure variable: The exposure that these children were subjected to was vitamin A supplementation. The children either received supplementation by vitamin A capsule distribution biannually or they were not exposed to the vitamin A program and therefore did not receive a vitamin A capsules or only received one capsule during the polio National Immunization Day campaign in November, 1999. The children who received one capsule were still categorized as unexposed since the capsule was provided more than 8 months prior to data collection. Disease: The outcome or health condition that results from lack of adequate vitamin A. This condition is called vitamin A deficiency disease (VAD), which exhibits clinically as nightblindness and xeropthalmia. Children may also have increased susceptibility to infections (such as acute respiratory infection) and diarrhea. Methods/Measurements: The nutritional status of children age 6-60 months was estimated using mid-upper arm circumference. A trained ophthalmology assistant assessed for nightblindness, Bitot's spots, corneal and conjunctival xerosis and corneal ulceration. A trained female community health worker interviewed mothers to determine their report of disease, health practices, and feeding of vitamin A-rich foods to her children. Findings: A total of 876 children from 587 households were included in this study. There were 440 children from supplemented and 436 from unsupplemented districts with 201 children supplemented during the polio NID campaign and 235 truly unsupplemented. When stratifying for risk factors such as number of children interviewed per household, age, gender, socio-economic status and vitamin A-rich foods fed to children, children who received vitamin A supplementation twice a year for the past seven years had better health outcomes regardless of risk factor. Conclusion: Supplementation is necessary on a scheduled twice a year regimen. Even children who only receive a vitamin A capsule one time during the polio NID campaign or are fed vitamin A-rich foods were not as protected as those children who receive vitamin A on a regular twice yearly scheduled dose. Implications: Continued support must be provided for the National Vitamin A program in Nepal until further research studies discover alternative approaches to supplementation such as food fortification, "golden rice", or locally available foods that are feasible and sustainable in Nepal to either replace or complement the program.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIs Vitamin A Supplementation Necessary for Children Age 6-60 Months in the Mid-Hills of Nepal?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153677-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Is Vitamin A Supplementation Necessary for Children Age 6-60 Months in the Mid-Hills of Nepal?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Grubesic, Ruth</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Texas Women's University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Clinical Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rgrubesic@twu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To compare the prevalence of health outcomes (vitamin A deficiency disease, malnutrition, diarrhea and acute respiratory infection) by supplementation status and other risk factors in two groups of children age 6-60 months, (those supplemented with 100,000-200,000 IU of vitamin A capsules and those children not supplemented). Design: A supplemented intervention vs. unsupplemented comparison study design with two independent samples compared these two groups of children. A third group emerged from the unsupplemented group; those children in the unsupplemented group who received a vitamin A capsule once during the polio National Immunization Day campaign (polio NID) in November 1999. Subjects: Children age 6-60 months from a sample of children in two districts of Nepal (during the summer of 2000), one group that received vitamin A capsule distribution in the past 6 months and another group that did not receive capsule distribution or only received one capsule eight months prior to data collection. Variables: Exposure variable: The exposure that these children were subjected to was vitamin A supplementation. The children either received supplementation by vitamin A capsule distribution biannually or they were not exposed to the vitamin A program and therefore did not receive a vitamin A capsules or only received one capsule during the polio National Immunization Day campaign in November, 1999. The children who received one capsule were still categorized as unexposed since the capsule was provided more than 8 months prior to data collection. Disease: The outcome or health condition that results from lack of adequate vitamin A. This condition is called vitamin A deficiency disease (VAD), which exhibits clinically as nightblindness and xeropthalmia. Children may also have increased susceptibility to infections (such as acute respiratory infection) and diarrhea. Methods/Measurements: The nutritional status of children age 6-60 months was estimated using mid-upper arm circumference. A trained ophthalmology assistant assessed for nightblindness, Bitot's spots, corneal and conjunctival xerosis and corneal ulceration. A trained female community health worker interviewed mothers to determine their report of disease, health practices, and feeding of vitamin A-rich foods to her children. Findings: A total of 876 children from 587 households were included in this study. There were 440 children from supplemented and 436 from unsupplemented districts with 201 children supplemented during the polio NID campaign and 235 truly unsupplemented. When stratifying for risk factors such as number of children interviewed per household, age, gender, socio-economic status and vitamin A-rich foods fed to children, children who received vitamin A supplementation twice a year for the past seven years had better health outcomes regardless of risk factor. Conclusion: Supplementation is necessary on a scheduled twice a year regimen. Even children who only receive a vitamin A capsule one time during the polio NID campaign or are fed vitamin A-rich foods were not as protected as those children who receive vitamin A on a regular twice yearly scheduled dose. Implications: Continued support must be provided for the National Vitamin A program in Nepal until further research studies discover alternative approaches to supplementation such as food fortification, &quot;golden rice&quot;, or locally available foods that are feasible and sustainable in Nepal to either replace or complement the program.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:26:15Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:26:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.