Prostate Cancer Treatment-Related Symptoms: What are Men Most Concerned About?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153679
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prostate Cancer Treatment-Related Symptoms: What are Men Most Concerned About?
Abstract:
Prostate Cancer Treatment-Related Symptoms: What are Men Most Concerned About?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Galbraith, Michael, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Loma Linda University
Title:Professor
Objective: The objective of this study was to compare men's experiences with prostate cancer treatment-specific symptoms over 18 months. Design: The study used a longitudinal survey design that had descriptive and comparative elements. Population, sample, setting, and years: The sample was obtained from a population of men who were diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and presented for treatment or follow-up for at a Southern California University Medical Center and associated facilities during 1996 to 1999. A total of 185 men were enrolled into the study from 5 prostate cancer treatment strategies: (1) watchful waiting; (2) surgery; (3) conventional external-beam radiation; (4) proton-beam radiation; and (5) a combination of 3 and 4, or mixed-beam radiation. The average age of the men was 68 years with 87% married or with a partner; only 1% was single. Sixty-five percent had at least some college education and 34% had incomes of over $50,000. Most men were white (82%); however, African-American (6%) and Hispanic (7%) men were represented in the sample. The average PSA level at the time of enrollment into the study was 13.6. Variables studied together: The variables in the study were patient self-reports of their experiences with the three most common side effects that can result from prostate cancer treatment; problems with gastrointestinal, urinary, and sexual functioning. The type of treatment each participant received determined in which group membership and time was measured in months. Methods: The investigator contacted all potential participants before they started treatment and invited them to participate in the study. If they agreed to participate, they were provided with a packet that included; a) a cover letter, b) two consent forms, c) the questionnaire, and d) a self addressed stamped envelope for returning the questionnaire and one signed consent form. They were contacted again at 6, 12, and 18 months and provided with another questionnaire packet. If they did not return the study materials within two weeks, they were given reminder telephone calls. Symptoms were measured with the Prostate Treatment-specific Symptoms instrument (PTSS) developed by the Southwestern Oncology Group. It was a 19-item measure that focused specifically on gastrointestinal, urinary, and sexual symptoms that can occur as a result of treatment for prostate cancer. Item scores ranged from 1 (no symptoms) to 5 (severe symptoms). Three scales were constructed clusters of items that measured the same symptom. Reliability coefficients for the three symptoms scales ranged from 0.61 to 0.80. Analyses included descriptive statistics, repeated measures analysis of variance, and effect size determinations. Findings: The five treatment groups differed only in gastrointestinal symptoms over the 18 months of the study (F [4, 180]=3.7, p < 0.01). Yet the magnitude of the difference in gastrointestinal symptoms between the five groups was small (Eta squared=0.05). However, all five treatment groups reported they experienced more sexual symptoms and were more concerned about them than either urinary or gastrointestinal symptoms at each of the 4 data collection points: pre-treatment (F [1, 84]=3447, p < 0.001; Eta squared=0.98); six months (F [1, 84]=707, p < 0.001; Eta squared=0.88), 12 months (F [1, 84]=708, p < 0.001; Eta squared=0.89), and 18 months (F [1, 84]=615, p < 0.001; Eta squared=0.87). As noted by the Eta squared coefficients, the magnitude of the differences between the sexual symptoms and either urinary or gastrointestinal symptoms was substantial. Conclusions: Over the 18 months of the study, there were few overall differences among the treatment groups in how they rated gastrointestinal, urinary, or sexual symptoms that resulted from prostate cancer or its treatment. However, at each data collection point, the participants reported substantial differences in how they experienced the three most frequently occurring types of prostate cancer treatment symptoms. They reported sexual symptoms were more severe and they were more concerned about them than either gastrointestinal or urinary symptoms. Implications: If sexual symptoms concern prostate cancer survivors more than other potential side effects of the diagnosis or treatment for prostate cancer, it would be important to provide men with additional information pre- and post-treatment regarding what options they had in managing their sexual functioning. In addition, it would be important to assess how their spouses or committed partners are impacted by the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Lastly, interventions aimed at assisting couples in managing their responses to prostate cancer and treatment would be warranted.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProstate Cancer Treatment-Related Symptoms: What are Men Most Concerned About?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153679-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Prostate Cancer Treatment-Related Symptoms: What are Men Most Concerned About?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Galbraith, Michael, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loma Linda University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mgalbraith@sn.llu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objective of this study was to compare men's experiences with prostate cancer treatment-specific symptoms over 18 months. Design: The study used a longitudinal survey design that had descriptive and comparative elements. Population, sample, setting, and years: The sample was obtained from a population of men who were diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and presented for treatment or follow-up for at a Southern California University Medical Center and associated facilities during 1996 to 1999. A total of 185 men were enrolled into the study from 5 prostate cancer treatment strategies: (1) watchful waiting; (2) surgery; (3) conventional external-beam radiation; (4) proton-beam radiation; and (5) a combination of 3 and 4, or mixed-beam radiation. The average age of the men was 68 years with 87% married or with a partner; only 1% was single. Sixty-five percent had at least some college education and 34% had incomes of over $50,000. Most men were white (82%); however, African-American (6%) and Hispanic (7%) men were represented in the sample. The average PSA level at the time of enrollment into the study was 13.6. Variables studied together: The variables in the study were patient self-reports of their experiences with the three most common side effects that can result from prostate cancer treatment; problems with gastrointestinal, urinary, and sexual functioning. The type of treatment each participant received determined in which group membership and time was measured in months. Methods: The investigator contacted all potential participants before they started treatment and invited them to participate in the study. If they agreed to participate, they were provided with a packet that included; a) a cover letter, b) two consent forms, c) the questionnaire, and d) a self addressed stamped envelope for returning the questionnaire and one signed consent form. They were contacted again at 6, 12, and 18 months and provided with another questionnaire packet. If they did not return the study materials within two weeks, they were given reminder telephone calls. Symptoms were measured with the Prostate Treatment-specific Symptoms instrument (PTSS) developed by the Southwestern Oncology Group. It was a 19-item measure that focused specifically on gastrointestinal, urinary, and sexual symptoms that can occur as a result of treatment for prostate cancer. Item scores ranged from 1 (no symptoms) to 5 (severe symptoms). Three scales were constructed clusters of items that measured the same symptom. Reliability coefficients for the three symptoms scales ranged from 0.61 to 0.80. Analyses included descriptive statistics, repeated measures analysis of variance, and effect size determinations. Findings: The five treatment groups differed only in gastrointestinal symptoms over the 18 months of the study (F [4, 180]=3.7, p &lt; 0.01). Yet the magnitude of the difference in gastrointestinal symptoms between the five groups was small (Eta squared=0.05). However, all five treatment groups reported they experienced more sexual symptoms and were more concerned about them than either urinary or gastrointestinal symptoms at each of the 4 data collection points: pre-treatment (F [1, 84]=3447, p &lt; 0.001; Eta squared=0.98); six months (F [1, 84]=707, p &lt; 0.001; Eta squared=0.88), 12 months (F [1, 84]=708, p &lt; 0.001; Eta squared=0.89), and 18 months (F [1, 84]=615, p &lt; 0.001; Eta squared=0.87). As noted by the Eta squared coefficients, the magnitude of the differences between the sexual symptoms and either urinary or gastrointestinal symptoms was substantial. Conclusions: Over the 18 months of the study, there were few overall differences among the treatment groups in how they rated gastrointestinal, urinary, or sexual symptoms that resulted from prostate cancer or its treatment. However, at each data collection point, the participants reported substantial differences in how they experienced the three most frequently occurring types of prostate cancer treatment symptoms. They reported sexual symptoms were more severe and they were more concerned about them than either gastrointestinal or urinary symptoms. Implications: If sexual symptoms concern prostate cancer survivors more than other potential side effects of the diagnosis or treatment for prostate cancer, it would be important to provide men with additional information pre- and post-treatment regarding what options they had in managing their sexual functioning. In addition, it would be important to assess how their spouses or committed partners are impacted by the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Lastly, interventions aimed at assisting couples in managing their responses to prostate cancer and treatment would be warranted.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:26:20Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:26:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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