Are Newly Licensed Nurses Prepared for the Realities of the Practice Setting?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153680
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Are Newly Licensed Nurses Prepared for the Realities of the Practice Setting?
Abstract:
Are Newly Licensed Nurses Prepared for the Realities of the Practice Setting?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Smith, June
P.I. Institution Name:National Council of State Boards of Nursing
Title:Manager of Research Services
Objective: Boards of nursing share a mission of public safety. Fulfillment of that mission includes, for most boards, review and approval (or accreditation) of programs of nursing education. Newly licensed nurses and their employers are in a unique position to provide feedback on the adequacy of those educational processes. The objective of this study was exploration of the adequacy of preparation of new nurses for the realities of the practice setting. Design: This will be non-experimental, descriptive study. Population and Sample: This study utilized a stratified random sample (stratified by geographic location and type of educational preparation) of 1000 registered nurses (RNs), within six months of initial licensure, from all over the United States, and a sample of 1000 acute care and 500 long term care nurse employers. The methodology used to select the employer facilities provided a random sample with equal representation from each of the fifty states. Concept or Variables Studied Together: This study explored opinions of newly licensed RNs and nurse employers on the preparation of nurses for the realities of entry-level practice. Preparation to perform a variety of tasks was investigated including: performing physical assessments, recognizing abnormal physical and lab findings, responding to emergency situations, creating plans of care, supervising care provided by others, performing psychomotor skills, administering medications, performing the calculations necessary for medication administration, working with machinery used for patient care, assessing the effectiveness of treatments, documenting a legally defensible account of care provided, teaching patients, and working effectively within a health care team. Methods: Two questionnaires were used for this study: the Newly Licensed Nurse Practice and Professional Issues Survey, and the Employer Survey. The former survey was sent to 1000 registered nurses within their first six months of practice. That survey contained a section asking respondents to rate how adequately their nursing education program had prepared them to perform the previously listed tasks. The Employer Survey asked nursing supervisors to rate the preparation of newly licensed nurses to perform the same tasks. Employer respondents were asked to provide separate ratings for graduates of associate degree, baccalaureate degree and diploma nursing programs. The RN subjects were engaged in the study through a four-stage mailing methodology. The Newly Licensed Nurse Practice and Professional Issues Survey was mailed to the sample in June 2001. One week later a first reminder postcard was sent to all potential participants. A second reminder postcard was mailed a week later to non-respondents. Approximately a week after the second reminder, a second survey was sent to continued non-respondents. The employer subjects were encouraged to participate with a five stage mailing process. That process mirrored that used for the RN subjects with the exception of a pre-letter sent to the employer sample explaining the study and encouraging participation. The Employer Survey mailings were started in last week of October 2001. Findings: The survey sent to RNs garnered a 64% return rate. The RN respondents were most positive about their educational preparation for the administration of medications, performing the math necessary for medication administration, creating care plans, and performing physical assessments. They were markedly less positive about their preparation for responding to emergency situations, supervising care provided by others, working with patient care machinery, and performing psychomotor skills. Results of the Employer Survey will be accumulated and analyzed in December 2001. Conclusions: Newly licensed RNs indicated that their educational programs did not completely prepare them for many practice setting demands. Input from employers of newly licensed nurses will provide further evidence supporting or refuting these findings. Implications: Programs of nursing education and boards of nursing may use the data from this study as a framework for program evaluation and improvement.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAre Newly Licensed Nurses Prepared for the Realities of the Practice Setting?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153680-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Are Newly Licensed Nurses Prepared for the Realities of the Practice Setting?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, June</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">National Council of State Boards of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Manager of Research Services</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jsmith@ncsbn.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Boards of nursing share a mission of public safety. Fulfillment of that mission includes, for most boards, review and approval (or accreditation) of programs of nursing education. Newly licensed nurses and their employers are in a unique position to provide feedback on the adequacy of those educational processes. The objective of this study was exploration of the adequacy of preparation of new nurses for the realities of the practice setting. Design: This will be non-experimental, descriptive study. Population and Sample: This study utilized a stratified random sample (stratified by geographic location and type of educational preparation) of 1000 registered nurses (RNs), within six months of initial licensure, from all over the United States, and a sample of 1000 acute care and 500 long term care nurse employers. The methodology used to select the employer facilities provided a random sample with equal representation from each of the fifty states. Concept or Variables Studied Together: This study explored opinions of newly licensed RNs and nurse employers on the preparation of nurses for the realities of entry-level practice. Preparation to perform a variety of tasks was investigated including: performing physical assessments, recognizing abnormal physical and lab findings, responding to emergency situations, creating plans of care, supervising care provided by others, performing psychomotor skills, administering medications, performing the calculations necessary for medication administration, working with machinery used for patient care, assessing the effectiveness of treatments, documenting a legally defensible account of care provided, teaching patients, and working effectively within a health care team. Methods: Two questionnaires were used for this study: the Newly Licensed Nurse Practice and Professional Issues Survey, and the Employer Survey. The former survey was sent to 1000 registered nurses within their first six months of practice. That survey contained a section asking respondents to rate how adequately their nursing education program had prepared them to perform the previously listed tasks. The Employer Survey asked nursing supervisors to rate the preparation of newly licensed nurses to perform the same tasks. Employer respondents were asked to provide separate ratings for graduates of associate degree, baccalaureate degree and diploma nursing programs. The RN subjects were engaged in the study through a four-stage mailing methodology. The Newly Licensed Nurse Practice and Professional Issues Survey was mailed to the sample in June 2001. One week later a first reminder postcard was sent to all potential participants. A second reminder postcard was mailed a week later to non-respondents. Approximately a week after the second reminder, a second survey was sent to continued non-respondents. The employer subjects were encouraged to participate with a five stage mailing process. That process mirrored that used for the RN subjects with the exception of a pre-letter sent to the employer sample explaining the study and encouraging participation. The Employer Survey mailings were started in last week of October 2001. Findings: The survey sent to RNs garnered a 64% return rate. The RN respondents were most positive about their educational preparation for the administration of medications, performing the math necessary for medication administration, creating care plans, and performing physical assessments. They were markedly less positive about their preparation for responding to emergency situations, supervising care provided by others, working with patient care machinery, and performing psychomotor skills. Results of the Employer Survey will be accumulated and analyzed in December 2001. Conclusions: Newly licensed RNs indicated that their educational programs did not completely prepare them for many practice setting demands. Input from employers of newly licensed nurses will provide further evidence supporting or refuting these findings. Implications: Programs of nursing education and boards of nursing may use the data from this study as a framework for program evaluation and improvement.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:26:22Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:26:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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