2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153682
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women Of The Veil
Abstract:
Women Of The Veil
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Cise, Janice, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Indianapolis
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: This paper presents a comparison between the veiling strategies of a group of seriously overweight women in the United States and the veiling customs of Arabic Islamic women. The term "veil" is used as a metaphor and analogical device for a feminine approach to interpretive inquiry. Design: Interpretive phenomenology was used to in this study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The participants were middle aged women, ages 39 to 55, who weighed more than 40% above ideal. The women were engaged in an eight-week program of self-reflective guided imagery. A mix of ethnic backgrounds was represented (5 Afro-American or black and 6 Caucasian or white). All the women were employed and had 12 to 16+ years of education. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variable(s): The aim of the research was to describe and interpret the issues that emerged among women who took part in an eight week program of self-reflective guided imagery. Methods: Naturalistic methods include unstructured tape recorded group discussions, self portraits, participant journals, and researcher field journal. The investigator was a participant observer. A seven phase process of analysis, based on the techniques of Diekelman and Dobbie, was adopted for this study. Findings: "Veil" describes the way some middle aged, seriously overweight women interpret their own experiences. The women have "professional" and "obese" perspectives of themselves. Engagement of the obese perspective, acts like a semi-transparent, gauzy veil through which the women interpret themselves and evaluate what they do. Engagement of the veil lends meaning to ordinary life events. "Veil" took on a broader meaning and came to represent the women's need for protection, against lewd or hurtful statements by others, and as a way to keep themselves visually hidden from others and internally hidden from themselves. The isolating and protective strategies give rise to the term "Veil of Obesity". Conclusions: The term "Veil of Obesity" is a metaphor helpful in setting up an analogy comparing the women's experiences with obesity and the women of Islam's experience with living under the veil. The veil metaphor evolved into an analogy, which compared 20th Century Western women's experiences of living under a "Veil of Obesity" and the women of Islam's experience with living under the veil. Moroccan sociologist, Mernissi (1991) discusses the meaning of veiling among Islamic women as three dimensional: visual, spatial, and abstract. Strong parallels are seen between the veiling customs of Islamic women and the practices of overweight women. Universality of meanings and customs of concealment are discussed. Implications: The outcome of this analysis is a reframing of obesity, not as disease but as a way of coping. When hiding strategies are perceived as the "Veil of Obesity", the question that should be raised in the minds of health care practitioners is, "If seriously overweight women use the 'Veil of Obesity' as a shield against uncomfortable or painful feelings, what happens to the women who have this veil stripped away?" Experience with relapse indicates it is likely that a woman will regain lost weight unless less effective ways of coping are replaced with more effective ones.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen Of The Veilen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153682-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women Of The Veil</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cise, Janice, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Indianapolis</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cise@uindy.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This paper presents a comparison between the veiling strategies of a group of seriously overweight women in the United States and the veiling customs of Arabic Islamic women. The term &quot;veil&quot; is used as a metaphor and analogical device for a feminine approach to interpretive inquiry. Design: Interpretive phenomenology was used to in this study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The participants were middle aged women, ages 39 to 55, who weighed more than 40% above ideal. The women were engaged in an eight-week program of self-reflective guided imagery. A mix of ethnic backgrounds was represented (5 Afro-American or black and 6 Caucasian or white). All the women were employed and had 12 to 16+ years of education. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variable(s): The aim of the research was to describe and interpret the issues that emerged among women who took part in an eight week program of self-reflective guided imagery. Methods: Naturalistic methods include unstructured tape recorded group discussions, self portraits, participant journals, and researcher field journal. The investigator was a participant observer. A seven phase process of analysis, based on the techniques of Diekelman and Dobbie, was adopted for this study. Findings: &quot;Veil&quot; describes the way some middle aged, seriously overweight women interpret their own experiences. The women have &quot;professional&quot; and &quot;obese&quot; perspectives of themselves. Engagement of the obese perspective, acts like a semi-transparent, gauzy veil through which the women interpret themselves and evaluate what they do. Engagement of the veil lends meaning to ordinary life events. &quot;Veil&quot; took on a broader meaning and came to represent the women's need for protection, against lewd or hurtful statements by others, and as a way to keep themselves visually hidden from others and internally hidden from themselves. The isolating and protective strategies give rise to the term &quot;Veil of Obesity&quot;. Conclusions: The term &quot;Veil of Obesity&quot; is a metaphor helpful in setting up an analogy comparing the women's experiences with obesity and the women of Islam's experience with living under the veil. The veil metaphor evolved into an analogy, which compared 20th Century Western women's experiences of living under a &quot;Veil of Obesity&quot; and the women of Islam's experience with living under the veil. Moroccan sociologist, Mernissi (1991) discusses the meaning of veiling among Islamic women as three dimensional: visual, spatial, and abstract. Strong parallels are seen between the veiling customs of Islamic women and the practices of overweight women. Universality of meanings and customs of concealment are discussed. Implications: The outcome of this analysis is a reframing of obesity, not as disease but as a way of coping. When hiding strategies are perceived as the &quot;Veil of Obesity&quot;, the question that should be raised in the minds of health care practitioners is, &quot;If seriously overweight women use the 'Veil of Obesity' as a shield against uncomfortable or painful feelings, what happens to the women who have this veil stripped away?&quot; Experience with relapse indicates it is likely that a woman will regain lost weight unless less effective ways of coping are replaced with more effective ones.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:26:27Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:26:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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