Being in Tune with Life: Experiences of Complementary Therapies and Spiritual Well-being in Hospice Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153685
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Being in Tune with Life: Experiences of Complementary Therapies and Spiritual Well-being in Hospice Patients
Abstract:
Being in Tune with Life: Experiences of Complementary Therapies and Spiritual Well-being in Hospice Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Nelson, Jenenne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado-Colorado Springs
Title:Associate Professor
Complementary therapies are increasingly being used in hospice; however, little scientific information about complementary therapies is evident in the literature. Complementary therapies may include treatments such as acupuncture, massage Reiki, pet therapy, art therapy, and music therapy. The purpose of this study was to describe and analyze the responses and experiences of hospice patients who received complementary therapies. Objectives: The study objectives were: 1) To describe patterns and practices in hospice patients who were receiving complementary therapies. 2) To describe the lived experience of hospice patients who were receiving complementary therapies. Design: Ethnography is used to study culture. It is through culture that people form conceptual structures to create reality in the world they imagine (Geertz, 1973). In this study, ethnography was used to explore patterns and experiences of hospice residents who received complementary therapies. Methods: Participant observation, examination of cultural artifacts and interviews with hospice patients, staff, families, and volunteer took place over nine months of data collection. The researcher audio taped interviews, recorded observations in field notes, and recorded memos during the data collection and analyses. Sample: The sample included interviews with 15 hospice patients, data collected through interviews with 7 staff/volunteers, and multiple family members of hospice patients. In addition, patients' charts were reviewed for thematic content. Setting: The study was conducted in a 42-bed inpatient residential hospice unit in the western part of the United States. The residential hospice offered traditional western therapeutic interventions as well as numerous complementary therapies. Licensed volunteers provided complementary therapies to hospice patients at no charge. Findings: Four themes were uncovered during thematic analysis. Each of the four themes supported the patients' desire to feel physically and emotionally reconnected with a time they felt "in tune with life". The first theme was Reconnecting to Life through a Caring Environment. Staff nourished the patient's reconnection to life through a caring environment as they helped patients reconnect to past life interests. The second theme was Experiencing Complementary Therapies. The pervasive complementary therapy experience was an overwhelming sense of "being relaxed". Patients often felt their complementary therapy experiences were helpful but they could not articulate why the therapy helped them. One man summed up his experience after acupuncture saying that he was "not back to normal but . . . my feeling are much better". How does it make you feel? I've turned that over in my mind . . . well, it's like brushing your teeth, you brush your teeth and you feel better. And you really can't say why". The third theme was Feeling Cared For. There was a dance between taking care of the physical needs and taking care of the psychosocial and spiritual needs. Hospice staff seemed to go out of their way to help patients meet their needs. One patient explained that "They make themselves available in a way that you know it's genuine .... you just get the feeling that if you don't take advantage of this you're passing up a gift". Finally, the fourth theme was Being Present in Relationship. The importance of being present in relationship was a recurring theme in the spiritual well-being of hospice patients who received complementary therapies. Receiving complementary therapies was an important aspect of daily life for hospice patients; however, many patients looked forward to seeing the complementary therapy providers as much as receiving the therapy. While observing discussions between hospice patients and providers, it was evident that hospice patients relied heavily on their complementary therapy providers to furnish information and physical care that would "normalize" hospice patients' daily lives. Complementary therapy providers brought the "outside world" to the patient's life through music, pets, art, touch, massage, and acupuncture providing respite and distraction from physical life. Implications for Practice: Hospice nurses, and other health care professionals need to recognize that a variety of complementary therapies are important to some hospice patients' spiritual well-being. Creating a hospice environment that includes caring providers and complementary therapies is important to patients' well-being in the downward trajectory of life.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBeing in Tune with Life: Experiences of Complementary Therapies and Spiritual Well-being in Hospice Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153685-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Being in Tune with Life: Experiences of Complementary Therapies and Spiritual Well-being in Hospice Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nelson, Jenenne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado-Colorado Springs</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jnelson@uccs.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Complementary therapies are increasingly being used in hospice; however, little scientific information about complementary therapies is evident in the literature. Complementary therapies may include treatments such as acupuncture, massage Reiki, pet therapy, art therapy, and music therapy. The purpose of this study was to describe and analyze the responses and experiences of hospice patients who received complementary therapies. Objectives: The study objectives were: 1) To describe patterns and practices in hospice patients who were receiving complementary therapies. 2) To describe the lived experience of hospice patients who were receiving complementary therapies. Design: Ethnography is used to study culture. It is through culture that people form conceptual structures to create reality in the world they imagine (Geertz, 1973). In this study, ethnography was used to explore patterns and experiences of hospice residents who received complementary therapies. Methods: Participant observation, examination of cultural artifacts and interviews with hospice patients, staff, families, and volunteer took place over nine months of data collection. The researcher audio taped interviews, recorded observations in field notes, and recorded memos during the data collection and analyses. Sample: The sample included interviews with 15 hospice patients, data collected through interviews with 7 staff/volunteers, and multiple family members of hospice patients. In addition, patients' charts were reviewed for thematic content. Setting: The study was conducted in a 42-bed inpatient residential hospice unit in the western part of the United States. The residential hospice offered traditional western therapeutic interventions as well as numerous complementary therapies. Licensed volunteers provided complementary therapies to hospice patients at no charge. Findings: Four themes were uncovered during thematic analysis. Each of the four themes supported the patients' desire to feel physically and emotionally reconnected with a time they felt &quot;in tune with life&quot;. The first theme was Reconnecting to Life through a Caring Environment. Staff nourished the patient's reconnection to life through a caring environment as they helped patients reconnect to past life interests. The second theme was Experiencing Complementary Therapies. The pervasive complementary therapy experience was an overwhelming sense of &quot;being relaxed&quot;. Patients often felt their complementary therapy experiences were helpful but they could not articulate why the therapy helped them. One man summed up his experience after acupuncture saying that he was &quot;not back to normal but . . . my feeling are much better&quot;. How does it make you feel? I've turned that over in my mind . . . well, it's like brushing your teeth, you brush your teeth and you feel better. And you really can't say why&quot;. The third theme was Feeling Cared For. There was a dance between taking care of the physical needs and taking care of the psychosocial and spiritual needs. Hospice staff seemed to go out of their way to help patients meet their needs. One patient explained that &quot;They make themselves available in a way that you know it's genuine .... you just get the feeling that if you don't take advantage of this you're passing up a gift&quot;. Finally, the fourth theme was Being Present in Relationship. The importance of being present in relationship was a recurring theme in the spiritual well-being of hospice patients who received complementary therapies. Receiving complementary therapies was an important aspect of daily life for hospice patients; however, many patients looked forward to seeing the complementary therapy providers as much as receiving the therapy. While observing discussions between hospice patients and providers, it was evident that hospice patients relied heavily on their complementary therapy providers to furnish information and physical care that would &quot;normalize&quot; hospice patients' daily lives. Complementary therapy providers brought the &quot;outside world&quot; to the patient's life through music, pets, art, touch, massage, and acupuncture providing respite and distraction from physical life. Implications for Practice: Hospice nurses, and other health care professionals need to recognize that a variety of complementary therapies are important to some hospice patients' spiritual well-being. Creating a hospice environment that includes caring providers and complementary therapies is important to patients' well-being in the downward trajectory of life.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:26:35Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:26:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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