2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153686
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing a Research Measurement Scale: An Illustration of the Process
Abstract:
Developing a Research Measurement Scale: An Illustration of the Process
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:O'Connell, Kathleen
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University - Purdue University Fort Wayne
Title:Associate Professor and Associate Dean
Objective: Knowledge and skill in scale development allows the nurse researcher to develop research specific measurement instruments that enhance the state of the science and involve nurses as members of the larger interdisciplinary research community. This presentation will discuss scale development as illustrated by the steps involved with the development of the Parent-Child Attachment Scale. The presentation will include: reviewing the appropriate literature, item writing, implementing measures to assure validity and reliability, piloting an instrument, and psychometric testing. Design: The Parent-Child Attachment Scale was developed for use in a dissertation study on outcomes in adult children of seriously mentally ill parents. Items for the scale were written based on a review of the Attachment Theory literature. Concepts: Attachment Theory has roots in psychoanalytic theory and proposes that the child develops its sense of self and self esteem by its early interactions with the primary caregiver and assumes that attachment behaviors formed early in life form the basis for lifelong personality traits and feelings. Sample: A pilot study to establish psychometrics for the scale was implemented with a convenience sample of nursing students from two large Midwestern American universities. Eighty questionnaires were distributed and sixty- eight returned for a return rate of 85%. Methods: Prior to distribution to the pilot sample, items were submitted to a content review panel. The panel included two renowned experts in Attachment Theory, Drs. Sheree Toth and Dante Cicchetti from the Mount Hope Family Center at Rochester University, Rochester, New York. A content validity index (CVI) was calculated and the total instrument CVI was identified as 0.92, exceeding the recommended minimum CVI of 0.80. After questionnaires were received from the pilot sample, and data entered into SPSS, a scale reliability analysis was run on the 42 attachment variables, yielding a coefficient alpha of 0.80 for the scale. Corrected item-total correlations were reviewed and items with a value of 0.30 or greater were identified and retained while items less than 0.30 were dropped. Findings: A reliability analysis was run on the revised scale which resulted in an increase of the coefficient alpha to 0.93. The Family APGAR (Smilkstein, 1978) was revised and used to establish criterion-related and construct validity. Reliability analysis for the revised Family APGAR with the pilot population and yielded an alpha coefficient of 0.94 with corrected item-total correlations ranging from 0.75 to 0.87. Pearson correlations were 0.44 and 0.56 for the original and revised scale respectively. A factor analysis using principle components analysis resulted in 12 components extracted that accounted for a cumulative 77.6% of the variance. Varimax rotation did not reduce the number of factors. Forced factor loadings limited to 3 (father, mother, security) showed a cumulative 43.1% of the variance. Conclusions: The Parent-Child Attachment Scale (PCAS) was found to be a valid and reliable measurement tool with this research population. Implications: The ability to develop measurement tools for research elevates the science of nursing by allowing more precise measures of concepts by nurse researchers.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping a Research Measurement Scale: An Illustration of the Processen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153686-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Developing a Research Measurement Scale: An Illustration of the Process</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">O'Connell, Kathleen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University - Purdue University Fort Wayne</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">oconnell@ipfw.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Knowledge and skill in scale development allows the nurse researcher to develop research specific measurement instruments that enhance the state of the science and involve nurses as members of the larger interdisciplinary research community. This presentation will discuss scale development as illustrated by the steps involved with the development of the Parent-Child Attachment Scale. The presentation will include: reviewing the appropriate literature, item writing, implementing measures to assure validity and reliability, piloting an instrument, and psychometric testing. Design: The Parent-Child Attachment Scale was developed for use in a dissertation study on outcomes in adult children of seriously mentally ill parents. Items for the scale were written based on a review of the Attachment Theory literature. Concepts: Attachment Theory has roots in psychoanalytic theory and proposes that the child develops its sense of self and self esteem by its early interactions with the primary caregiver and assumes that attachment behaviors formed early in life form the basis for lifelong personality traits and feelings. Sample: A pilot study to establish psychometrics for the scale was implemented with a convenience sample of nursing students from two large Midwestern American universities. Eighty questionnaires were distributed and sixty- eight returned for a return rate of 85%. Methods: Prior to distribution to the pilot sample, items were submitted to a content review panel. The panel included two renowned experts in Attachment Theory, Drs. Sheree Toth and Dante Cicchetti from the Mount Hope Family Center at Rochester University, Rochester, New York. A content validity index (CVI) was calculated and the total instrument CVI was identified as 0.92, exceeding the recommended minimum CVI of 0.80. After questionnaires were received from the pilot sample, and data entered into SPSS, a scale reliability analysis was run on the 42 attachment variables, yielding a coefficient alpha of 0.80 for the scale. Corrected item-total correlations were reviewed and items with a value of 0.30 or greater were identified and retained while items less than 0.30 were dropped. Findings: A reliability analysis was run on the revised scale which resulted in an increase of the coefficient alpha to 0.93. The Family APGAR (Smilkstein, 1978) was revised and used to establish criterion-related and construct validity. Reliability analysis for the revised Family APGAR with the pilot population and yielded an alpha coefficient of 0.94 with corrected item-total correlations ranging from 0.75 to 0.87. Pearson correlations were 0.44 and 0.56 for the original and revised scale respectively. A factor analysis using principle components analysis resulted in 12 components extracted that accounted for a cumulative 77.6% of the variance. Varimax rotation did not reduce the number of factors. Forced factor loadings limited to 3 (father, mother, security) showed a cumulative 43.1% of the variance. Conclusions: The Parent-Child Attachment Scale (PCAS) was found to be a valid and reliable measurement tool with this research population. Implications: The ability to develop measurement tools for research elevates the science of nursing by allowing more precise measures of concepts by nurse researchers.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:26:37Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:26:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.