Hot Flushes, Night Sweats, and Mood Disturbance: Is That What the Perimenopause Is Really Like?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153689
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hot Flushes, Night Sweats, and Mood Disturbance: Is That What the Perimenopause Is Really Like?
Abstract:
Hot Flushes, Night Sweats, and Mood Disturbance: Is That What the Perimenopause Is Really Like?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:McVeigh, Carol, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Griffith University - Logan Campus
Title:Associate Professor
Introduction: For the first time in history most women in developed countries can expect to live 30 years beyond menopause. Although the perimenopause can be a critical time in a woman's life the medico-scientific literature suggests that most women experience few major difficulties during this period. Despite this, the consequences of estrogen decline can lead to vasomotor symptoms, decreases in bone density, urogenital discomfort, sexual dysfunction, irregular uterine bleeding (Sulak, 1996), psychological distress (Stewart & Boydell, 1993), and affective or cognitive disorders (Lichtman, 1996; Schmidt, Roca, Bloch, & Rubinow, 1997; Sherwin, 1996). Although much has been written about menopause from a scientific perspective, little is known about individual experiences of hormone decline and the resulting symptoms. Moving beyond the medico-scientific view of menopause this study aims to identify the most common perimenopausal symptoms experienced by a group of Australian women. In addition it examines the relationship between symptom event, severity of symptoms and the quality of life experienced by the participants. Objective & Method: This correlational study aims to identify the most common perimenopausal symptoms experienced by a group of Australian women. In addition it examines the relationship between symptom event, severity of symptoms and quality of life. This study seeks to answer the following questions: 1) What are the most common perimenopausal symptoms experienced by Australian women aged 45 to 55 years? 2) To what extent are perimenopausal symptoms troublesome? 3) What relationships exist between the incidence and severity of perimenopausal symptoms and quality of life? Participants & Setting: A convenience sample of 300 women, all of whom will be aged 45 to 55 years, currently experiencing good health, and able to read, write and speak English will be surveyed. Participants will be contacted through a variety of women's health centers in Queensland, Australia. Main Outcome Measure: The Women's Health Assessment and Quality of Life Scales (Li, 1997). Procedure: With full ethics approval, all women's health centers listed with Women's Health Queensland, Women's Infolink, and the Queensland Health Department will be contacted in writing and invited to participate. Once access is approved, centers and individual practitioners will be provided with display posters and reply paid registration cards. All women who express willingness to participate in this study by returning a registration card will be mailed full details about the study, a questionnaire booklet, a stamped self-addressed envelope for questionnaire return, and informed written consent will be obtained. Significance: This study has significance for midwives and women's health nurses. Midwives and women's health nurses aim to provide holistic, client-centered evidence based care. In order to provide such care, it is necessary for practitioners to understand the phenomena under investigation. This study will contribute to midwifery and women's health knowledge and theory development and provide a better understanding of the perimemopause. The information that emerges may enable midwives and women's health nurses to: - Provide up-to-date information to their clients about the perimenopause; - Provide an environment that encourages women to make informed choices about treatment options; - Design appropriate education, information and support services for mid-aged women; - Identify women at risk of distress during the perimenopause; - Prepare future midwives and women's health nurses who consider the needs of perimenopausal women; - Provide a basis for future longitudinal research into the perimenopause; and - Provide holistic care for women as they enter the Perimenopause. Findings: This is the first study of this type to be carried out in Queensland, Australia. Currently little is known about the incidence and severity of perimenopausal symptoms in healthy Australian women and no information is available on the relationship between perimenopausal symptoms and quality of life. Data is currently being gathered and preliminary results will be available for presentation in Brisbane.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHot Flushes, Night Sweats, and Mood Disturbance: Is That What the Perimenopause Is Really Like?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153689-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hot Flushes, Night Sweats, and Mood Disturbance: Is That What the Perimenopause Is Really Like?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McVeigh, Carol, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Griffith University - Logan Campus</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cmcveigh@ozemail.com.au</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: For the first time in history most women in developed countries can expect to live 30 years beyond menopause. Although the perimenopause can be a critical time in a woman's life the medico-scientific literature suggests that most women experience few major difficulties during this period. Despite this, the consequences of estrogen decline can lead to vasomotor symptoms, decreases in bone density, urogenital discomfort, sexual dysfunction, irregular uterine bleeding (Sulak, 1996), psychological distress (Stewart &amp; Boydell, 1993), and affective or cognitive disorders (Lichtman, 1996; Schmidt, Roca, Bloch, &amp; Rubinow, 1997; Sherwin, 1996). Although much has been written about menopause from a scientific perspective, little is known about individual experiences of hormone decline and the resulting symptoms. Moving beyond the medico-scientific view of menopause this study aims to identify the most common perimenopausal symptoms experienced by a group of Australian women. In addition it examines the relationship between symptom event, severity of symptoms and the quality of life experienced by the participants. Objective &amp; Method: This correlational study aims to identify the most common perimenopausal symptoms experienced by a group of Australian women. In addition it examines the relationship between symptom event, severity of symptoms and quality of life. This study seeks to answer the following questions: 1) What are the most common perimenopausal symptoms experienced by Australian women aged 45 to 55 years? 2) To what extent are perimenopausal symptoms troublesome? 3) What relationships exist between the incidence and severity of perimenopausal symptoms and quality of life? Participants &amp; Setting: A convenience sample of 300 women, all of whom will be aged 45 to 55 years, currently experiencing good health, and able to read, write and speak English will be surveyed. Participants will be contacted through a variety of women's health centers in Queensland, Australia. Main Outcome Measure: The Women's Health Assessment and Quality of Life Scales (Li, 1997). Procedure: With full ethics approval, all women's health centers listed with Women's Health Queensland, Women's Infolink, and the Queensland Health Department will be contacted in writing and invited to participate. Once access is approved, centers and individual practitioners will be provided with display posters and reply paid registration cards. All women who express willingness to participate in this study by returning a registration card will be mailed full details about the study, a questionnaire booklet, a stamped self-addressed envelope for questionnaire return, and informed written consent will be obtained. Significance: This study has significance for midwives and women's health nurses. Midwives and women's health nurses aim to provide holistic, client-centered evidence based care. In order to provide such care, it is necessary for practitioners to understand the phenomena under investigation. This study will contribute to midwifery and women's health knowledge and theory development and provide a better understanding of the perimemopause. The information that emerges may enable midwives and women's health nurses to: - Provide up-to-date information to their clients about the perimenopause; - Provide an environment that encourages women to make informed choices about treatment options; - Design appropriate education, information and support services for mid-aged women; - Identify women at risk of distress during the perimenopause; - Prepare future midwives and women's health nurses who consider the needs of perimenopausal women; - Provide a basis for future longitudinal research into the perimenopause; and - Provide holistic care for women as they enter the Perimenopause. Findings: This is the first study of this type to be carried out in Queensland, Australia. Currently little is known about the incidence and severity of perimenopausal symptoms in healthy Australian women and no information is available on the relationship between perimenopausal symptoms and quality of life. Data is currently being gathered and preliminary results will be available for presentation in Brisbane.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:26:45Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:26:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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