The Perpetuation of Professional Values: A Comparison of the Values of Practicing Professional Nurses With the Values of Graduating Nursing Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153715
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Perpetuation of Professional Values: A Comparison of the Values of Practicing Professional Nurses With the Values of Graduating Nursing Students
Abstract:
The Perpetuation of Professional Values: A Comparison of the Values of Practicing Professional Nurses With the Values of Graduating Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Alfred, Danita, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Texas at Tyler
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Pamela Martin, PhD, RN; Susan Yarbrough, PhD, RN
Objective: Advances in technology and expansion of nursing roles are creating complex ethical and moral dilemmas for professional nurses. A foundation of professional values is critical for decision making in this environment. The objective of this study was to determine the congruency in value orientation of practicing professional nurses and graduating nursing students. Design and Methods: This study used secondary analysis to determine the congruency in values orientation. Data from two previous studies were merged to answer this question. A survey design was used for both original studies. All participants completed the Nurses Professional Values Scale (NPVS). Sample: Data from practicing professional nurses were collected from a random sample of 453 members of the American Nurses Association. Student data were collected from a convenience sample of 1450 graduating students from associate and baccalaureate degree programs in Texas. Findings: Over 80% of the practicing professional nurses were 40 years or older compared to 60% of the graduating nursing students who were less than 30 years old. Sixty-eight percent of the practicing professional nurses held a minimum of a Masters degree. Sixty-three percent of the students were graduating from associate degree nursing programs and 37% were graduating from baccalaureate degree nursing programs. The mean total NPVS score for the practicing professional nurses was 178 (median = 185) and the mean total score for graduating nursing students was 181 (median = 183). Conclusions: Although the practicing professional nurses were significantly older and had more education than the graduating nursing students, the total scores for the two groups were encouragingly similar.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Perpetuation of Professional Values: A Comparison of the Values of Practicing Professional Nurses With the Values of Graduating Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153715-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Perpetuation of Professional Values: A Comparison of the Values of Practicing Professional Nurses With the Values of Graduating Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Alfred, Danita, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Texas at Tyler</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dalfred@mail.uttyl.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Pamela Martin, PhD, RN; Susan Yarbrough, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Advances in technology and expansion of nursing roles are creating complex ethical and moral dilemmas for professional nurses. A foundation of professional values is critical for decision making in this environment. The objective of this study was to determine the congruency in value orientation of practicing professional nurses and graduating nursing students. Design and Methods: This study used secondary analysis to determine the congruency in values orientation. Data from two previous studies were merged to answer this question. A survey design was used for both original studies. All participants completed the Nurses Professional Values Scale (NPVS). Sample: Data from practicing professional nurses were collected from a random sample of 453 members of the American Nurses Association. Student data were collected from a convenience sample of 1450 graduating students from associate and baccalaureate degree programs in Texas. Findings: Over 80% of the practicing professional nurses were 40 years or older compared to 60% of the graduating nursing students who were less than 30 years old. Sixty-eight percent of the practicing professional nurses held a minimum of a Masters degree. Sixty-three percent of the students were graduating from associate degree nursing programs and 37% were graduating from baccalaureate degree nursing programs. The mean total NPVS score for the practicing professional nurses was 178 (median = 185) and the mean total score for graduating nursing students was 181 (median = 183). Conclusions: Although the practicing professional nurses were significantly older and had more education than the graduating nursing students, the total scores for the two groups were encouragingly similar.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:27:52Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:27:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.