The Importance of Personality in Predicting Quality of Life as People Progress Through Dementia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153723
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Importance of Personality in Predicting Quality of Life as People Progress Through Dementia
Abstract:
The Importance of Personality in Predicting Quality of Life as People Progress Through Dementia
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Burgener, Sandy C., RNC, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Prudence Twigg, RNC, MS
Objectives: The study purpose was to identify predictors of quality of life (QoL) outcomes in persons with dementia. Design: A descriptive, longitudinal design was used. Population, Sample, Setting: A total of 96 participant pairs were sampled (persons with Alzheimer's, vascular, Lewy body, or mixed dementia and their family caregiver). Concepts/ Variables: The major predictor variable described here is personality, measured using the Adult Personality Rating Scale (APRS) and 60-item NEO-FFI. Caregivers completed the APRS, while the NEO-FFI was completed with the person with dementia. QoL was operationalized as functional ability, illness, psychological well being (including depression), productive behaviors (problem solving, task performance, and social behaviors), and personal control. Methods: Interviews were conducted within a year of the disease diagnosis (baseline) and every 6 months. Caregivers and care receivers were interviewed separately. Findings: Controlling for mental status in the regression analyses, at baseline, task-orientation predicted to functional ability and all three aspects of productive behaviors. Extroversion predicted to psychological well being, while neuroticism predicted to functional ability, depression, and illness. Predictors were similar at 18 months with extroversion now predicting to problem solving and hostility predicting to functional ability. Neuroticism and conscientiousness (R2 of .26 and .24) also now predicted to personal control. At 42 months, predictors remained consistent with extroversion predicting more strongly to psychological well being than at 18 months (R2 = .59 and .32, respectively) and to the social behaviors (R2 = .79). Conclusions: The importance of personality as a stable and consistent predictor of QoL outcomes in persons with dementia is well supported by these findings. Implications: The assessment of personality may be an important factor for identifying which persons may be at greatest risk for poorer QoL outcomes throughout the various stages of dementia.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Importance of Personality in Predicting Quality of Life as People Progress Through Dementiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153723-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Importance of Personality in Predicting Quality of Life as People Progress Through Dementia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Burgener, Sandy C., RNC, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sburgenr@uiuc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Prudence Twigg, RNC, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: The study purpose was to identify predictors of quality of life (QoL) outcomes in persons with dementia. Design: A descriptive, longitudinal design was used. Population, Sample, Setting: A total of 96 participant pairs were sampled (persons with Alzheimer's, vascular, Lewy body, or mixed dementia and their family caregiver). Concepts/ Variables: The major predictor variable described here is personality, measured using the Adult Personality Rating Scale (APRS) and 60-item NEO-FFI. Caregivers completed the APRS, while the NEO-FFI was completed with the person with dementia. QoL was operationalized as functional ability, illness, psychological well being (including depression), productive behaviors (problem solving, task performance, and social behaviors), and personal control. Methods: Interviews were conducted within a year of the disease diagnosis (baseline) and every 6 months. Caregivers and care receivers were interviewed separately. Findings: Controlling for mental status in the regression analyses, at baseline, task-orientation predicted to functional ability and all three aspects of productive behaviors. Extroversion predicted to psychological well being, while neuroticism predicted to functional ability, depression, and illness. Predictors were similar at 18 months with extroversion now predicting to problem solving and hostility predicting to functional ability. Neuroticism and conscientiousness (R2 of .26 and .24) also now predicted to personal control. At 42 months, predictors remained consistent with extroversion predicting more strongly to psychological well being than at 18 months (R2 = .59 and .32, respectively) and to the social behaviors (R2 = .79). Conclusions: The importance of personality as a stable and consistent predictor of QoL outcomes in persons with dementia is well supported by these findings. Implications: The assessment of personality may be an important factor for identifying which persons may be at greatest risk for poorer QoL outcomes throughout the various stages of dementia.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:28:12Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:28:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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