A Psychometric Examination of English and Spanish Versions of The Revised Conflict Tactics Scales

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153727
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Psychometric Examination of English and Spanish Versions of The Revised Conflict Tactics Scales
Abstract:
A Psychometric Examination of English and Spanish Versions of The Revised Conflict Tactics Scales
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Connelly, Cynthia D., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:1. Child and Adolescent Services Research Center (CASRC), San Diego, CA; 2. University of San Diego Hahn School of Nursing
Title:1. Research Scientist 2. Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Rae R. Newton, PhD; Gregory A. Aarons, PhD
Purpose: The Conflict Tactics Scale-Revised (CTS2) was developed in response to the critique and recommendations to improve and enlarge the Conflict Tactics Scales (CTS) measure of intimate partner violence (IPV). Translations have been developed in several languages; however, psychometric findings have only been reported for the English version. For research on IPV to progress with scientific rigor, the reliability and validity of existing measures must be empirically supported for use with ethnically diverse samples and with non-English speaking populations. The present study examined the psychometric properties of the CTS2, based upon the responses of English (n=211) and Spanish (n = 194) speaking Latina women. Method: Secondary data analysis was conducted on data provided by 395 community based, self-identified Latinas, (mean age of 34.9 years, SD = 11.37), living in San Diego, California. Inclusion criteria: completion of the CTS2 and missing no more than two CTS2 items. Results: Confirmatory factor analytic results supported a-priori, a five-factor model, specifying factors of negotiation, minor psychological aggression, severe psychological aggression, minor physical assault, and severe physical assault. In unconstrained two group models, loadings were of similar magnitude across language of administration, with the exception of the physical assault scales. Unconstrained and constrained model comparisons showed scale structure varied significantly by language group for physical assault. Internal consistency of total scale scores was satisfactory (Cronbach’s alpha .70-.84), however, subscale alpha’s ranged from .46 - .80. Conclusions: While results of our study show overall comparability for English and Spanish speaking Latinas, we note that simply combining the results across language groups may obscure important differences in rates of endorsement and patterns of responses that may reflect theoretically important cultural, educational, and economic differences. Research supported by NIDA K01-DA15145, NIMH MH01695, MH50313, MH55282, and California Wellness Foundation, Stuart Foundation, and Department for Social Services, State of California.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Psychometric Examination of English and Spanish Versions of The Revised Conflict Tactics Scalesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153727-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Psychometric Examination of English and Spanish Versions of The Revised Conflict Tactics Scales</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Connelly, Cynthia D., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">1. Child and Adolescent Services Research Center (CASRC), San Diego, CA; 2. University of San Diego Hahn School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">1. Research Scientist 2. Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cconnelly@casrc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Rae R. Newton, PhD; Gregory A. Aarons, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The Conflict Tactics Scale-Revised (CTS2) was developed in response to the critique and recommendations to improve and enlarge the Conflict Tactics Scales (CTS) measure of intimate partner violence (IPV). Translations have been developed in several languages; however, psychometric findings have only been reported for the English version. For research on IPV to progress with scientific rigor, the reliability and validity of existing measures must be empirically supported for use with ethnically diverse samples and with non-English speaking populations. The present study examined the psychometric properties of the CTS2, based upon the responses of English (n=211) and Spanish (n = 194) speaking Latina women. Method: Secondary data analysis was conducted on data provided by 395 community based, self-identified Latinas, (mean age of 34.9 years, SD = 11.37), living in San Diego, California. Inclusion criteria: completion of the CTS2 and missing no more than two CTS2 items. Results: Confirmatory factor analytic results supported a-priori, a five-factor model, specifying factors of negotiation, minor psychological aggression, severe psychological aggression, minor physical assault, and severe physical assault. In unconstrained two group models, loadings were of similar magnitude across language of administration, with the exception of the physical assault scales. Unconstrained and constrained model comparisons showed scale structure varied significantly by language group for physical assault. Internal consistency of total scale scores was satisfactory (Cronbach&rsquo;s alpha .70-.84), however, subscale alpha&rsquo;s ranged from .46 - .80. Conclusions: While results of our study show overall comparability for English and Spanish speaking Latinas, we note that simply combining the results across language groups may obscure important differences in rates of endorsement and patterns of responses that may reflect theoretically important cultural, educational, and economic differences. Research supported by NIDA K01-DA15145, NIMH MH01695, MH50313, MH55282, and California Wellness Foundation, Stuart Foundation, and Department for Social Services, State of California.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:28:22Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:28:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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