Patient Caregiver Dyads: Psychosocial Adjustment, Mood, Loneliness, Social Support, Stressors, and Reactions to Caregiving

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153729
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient Caregiver Dyads: Psychosocial Adjustment, Mood, Loneliness, Social Support, Stressors, and Reactions to Caregiving
Abstract:
Patient Caregiver Dyads: Psychosocial Adjustment, Mood, Loneliness, Social Support, Stressors, and Reactions to Caregiving
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Courts, Nancy Fleming, PhD, RN, NCC
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Title:Associate Professor and Chair
Co-Authors:Jamie R. Kendall, BSN
Objective: The purposes of this research were to investigate: (1) couple congruency in psychosocial adjustment to illness, mood, loneliness, and social support; (2) caregiver response to caregiving; and (3) stressful aspects of having and living with MS. Design: This was a nonexperimental, descriptive, survey design study to explore dyad congruence. Sample: Fourteen dyads randomly selected responded (47%). There were 10 females with MS, 11 white and 3 black; average age of patients was 52 and spouses 60; all had a high school diploma; 4 patients and 5 spouses had a graduate degree. Variables: The variables studied were psychosocial adjustment to illness, perception of social support, loneliness, mood, and stressor identification of having and living with MS. Method: Established instruments and a demographic data collection booklet with space for responses to open-ended questions about stressors and suggestions were mailed with a return envelop to each partner. Findings: Overall scores identified high levels of social support, some feelings of loneliness, and mixed levels of psychosocial adjustment to illness. Spouses reported difficulty dealing with symptoms, especially “invisible” symptoms, expressed feelings of helplessness, identified the number of roles required, and had specific suggestions to help other caregivers. For patients, whom to tell about the diagnosis, job security, feelings of isolation, uncertainity about the future, and the ignorance of other people were challenges described. Conclusions: Instruments are inadequate for dyad assessment since scores indicated high levels of adjustment and qualitative data indicated sources of pain and suffering. Patients and spouses need to be assessed individually and together. Implications: Nursing interventions include: continuous psychosocial assessment of patient and spouse; interventions for expression and validation of feelings; opportunities to ask ongoing questions; continuing information; teaching problem solving and decision-making skills; and counseling.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient Caregiver Dyads: Psychosocial Adjustment, Mood, Loneliness, Social Support, Stressors, and Reactions to Caregivingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153729-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patient Caregiver Dyads: Psychosocial Adjustment, Mood, Loneliness, Social Support, Stressors, and Reactions to Caregiving</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Courts, Nancy Fleming, PhD, RN, NCC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Carolina at Greensboro</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Chair</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nancy_courts@uncg.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jamie R. Kendall, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purposes of this research were to investigate: (1) couple congruency in psychosocial adjustment to illness, mood, loneliness, and social support; (2) caregiver response to caregiving; and (3) stressful aspects of having and living with MS. Design: This was a nonexperimental, descriptive, survey design study to explore dyad congruence. Sample: Fourteen dyads randomly selected responded (47%). There were 10 females with MS, 11 white and 3 black; average age of patients was 52 and spouses 60; all had a high school diploma; 4 patients and 5 spouses had a graduate degree. Variables: The variables studied were psychosocial adjustment to illness, perception of social support, loneliness, mood, and stressor identification of having and living with MS. Method: Established instruments and a demographic data collection booklet with space for responses to open-ended questions about stressors and suggestions were mailed with a return envelop to each partner. Findings: Overall scores identified high levels of social support, some feelings of loneliness, and mixed levels of psychosocial adjustment to illness. Spouses reported difficulty dealing with symptoms, especially &ldquo;invisible&rdquo; symptoms, expressed feelings of helplessness, identified the number of roles required, and had specific suggestions to help other caregivers. For patients, whom to tell about the diagnosis, job security, feelings of isolation, uncertainity about the future, and the ignorance of other people were challenges described. Conclusions: Instruments are inadequate for dyad assessment since scores indicated high levels of adjustment and qualitative data indicated sources of pain and suffering. Patients and spouses need to be assessed individually and together. Implications: Nursing interventions include: continuous psychosocial assessment of patient and spouse; interventions for expression and validation of feelings; opportunities to ask ongoing questions; continuing information; teaching problem solving and decision-making skills; and counseling.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:28:27Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:28:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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