2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153745
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Connectedness: An Essential Component of Web-Based Education
Abstract:
Connectedness: An Essential Component of Web-Based Education
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Johnston, Linda, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Carolina Aiken
Title:Associate Professor
Objectives: 1)To identify student perceptions of being connected to faculty and other students in a web-based learning environment; 2) To identify strategies to enhance student perceptions of connectedness. Design: Qualitative Population, Sample, Setting: The sample consisted of 51 undergraduate nursing students in a public university enrolled in a web-based Nursing Research course between 2001 and 2003. Concept: Connectedness Method: A Blackboard forum was created for each class asking students to anonymously provide feedback about their experience as web-based learners. Responses were reviewed by the faculty teaching the course. A common thread of feeling "unconnected" was identified by most students in the first class. The faculty then introduced strategies in future classes that students identified as helping them feel connected to each other and to the faculty member. These strategies were refined and confirmed by students in subsesquent classes. Findings: Students in web-based courses frequently feel isolated and alone. This feeling of being "unconnected" from faculty and other students can impede student learning. Strategies faculty can employ to help students feel connected in their learning include 1) providing a welcoming learning environment; 2)using interactive weekly discussion boards; 3) creating a supportive, stimulating faculty presence: 4) providing expert use of both critique and praise; 5) providing anonymous forums for student suggestions and complaints; and 6) communicating interest in and respect for each student as both a person an a learner. Conclusions: While web-based instruction can enhance and enrich student learning, this learning can be reduced if the student feels unconnected from faculty and other students. Effective strategies can be employed to enhance student perceptions of connectedness and thus enhance student learning. Implications: Web-based instruction is becoming increasingly common in undergraduate and graduate nursing programs. Strategies that will enhance the web-based learning experience are essential to the success of web-based nursing education.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConnectedness: An Essential Component of Web-Based Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153745-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Connectedness: An Essential Component of Web-Based Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnston, Linda, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Carolina Aiken</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lindaj@usca.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: 1)To identify student perceptions of being connected to faculty and other students in a web-based learning environment; 2) To identify strategies to enhance student perceptions of connectedness. Design: Qualitative Population, Sample, Setting: The sample consisted of 51 undergraduate nursing students in a public university enrolled in a web-based Nursing Research course between 2001 and 2003. Concept: Connectedness Method: A Blackboard forum was created for each class asking students to anonymously provide feedback about their experience as web-based learners. Responses were reviewed by the faculty teaching the course. A common thread of feeling &quot;unconnected&quot; was identified by most students in the first class. The faculty then introduced strategies in future classes that students identified as helping them feel connected to each other and to the faculty member. These strategies were refined and confirmed by students in subsesquent classes. Findings: Students in web-based courses frequently feel isolated and alone. This feeling of being &quot;unconnected&quot; from faculty and other students can impede student learning. Strategies faculty can employ to help students feel connected in their learning include 1) providing a welcoming learning environment; 2)using interactive weekly discussion boards; 3) creating a supportive, stimulating faculty presence: 4) providing expert use of both critique and praise; 5) providing anonymous forums for student suggestions and complaints; and 6) communicating interest in and respect for each student as both a person an a learner. Conclusions: While web-based instruction can enhance and enrich student learning, this learning can be reduced if the student feels unconnected from faculty and other students. Effective strategies can be employed to enhance student perceptions of connectedness and thus enhance student learning. Implications: Web-based instruction is becoming increasingly common in undergraduate and graduate nursing programs. Strategies that will enhance the web-based learning experience are essential to the success of web-based nursing education.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:29:08Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:29:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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