Adolescents’ Coping With Surgery for Scoliosis: Effects of Recovery Over Time

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153751
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescents’ Coping With Surgery for Scoliosis: Effects of Recovery Over Time
Abstract:
Adolescents’ Coping With Surgery for Scoliosis: Effects of Recovery Over Time
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:LaMontagne, Lynda L., RN, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:Vanderbilt University
Title:professor
Co-Authors:Michele H. Salisbury, RNC, PhD
Objective: To determine the effects of avoidance/vigilance coping on long term (nine months) recovery outcomes of adolescents undergoing spinal surgery for scoliosis and identify if coping strategies change over time. Design: A prospective longitudinal design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 113 patients (11-18 years old) completed the study. Mean age was 13.9; 84% were Caucasian and 91 were female, which is consistent with the incidence of idiopathic scoliosis. Data collection occurred over 4 years in a medical center in the southeastern U. S.A. Concepts: Coping, activities (physical, social, academic). Methods: Adolescents who participated were enrolled one day before surgery when the Preoperative Coping Interview and the Youth Self Report of Activities were administered. The Postoperative Coping Interview assessed coping strategy at 4 days, one month, 3 months and 6 months after surgery. Activities were assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months. Findings: More vigilant preoperative coping was a significant predictor of higher one month usual activities and new activities, six month new activities and six and nine month academic performance. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant time effect for coping. Adolescents became significantly more avoidant from in-hospital coping to one month postsurgery. Conclusions: Results show that adolescents who cope more vigilantly preoperatively (e.g., seek information, problem solve and rely on others) have better long term activity outcomes. Becoming more avoidant postoperatively could be attributed to the overwhelming stressors during recovery and discouragement over the progress of recovery. Implications: Adolescents undergoing major spinal surgery need interventions to enhance their coping during recovery. Nurses should prepare patients to anticipate a long and challenging recovery and provide supportive information at specific times during recovery to help patients cope more actively.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescents’ Coping With Surgery for Scoliosis: Effects of Recovery Over Timeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153751-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescents&rsquo; Coping With Surgery for Scoliosis: Effects of Recovery Over Time</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">LaMontagne, Lynda L., RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Vanderbilt University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Lynda.LaMontagne@mcmail.vanderbilt.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michele H. Salisbury, RNC, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To determine the effects of avoidance/vigilance coping on long term (nine months) recovery outcomes of adolescents undergoing spinal surgery for scoliosis and identify if coping strategies change over time. Design: A prospective longitudinal design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 113 patients (11-18 years old) completed the study. Mean age was 13.9; 84% were Caucasian and 91 were female, which is consistent with the incidence of idiopathic scoliosis. Data collection occurred over 4 years in a medical center in the southeastern U. S.A. Concepts: Coping, activities (physical, social, academic). Methods: Adolescents who participated were enrolled one day before surgery when the Preoperative Coping Interview and the Youth Self Report of Activities were administered. The Postoperative Coping Interview assessed coping strategy at 4 days, one month, 3 months and 6 months after surgery. Activities were assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months. Findings: More vigilant preoperative coping was a significant predictor of higher one month usual activities and new activities, six month new activities and six and nine month academic performance. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant time effect for coping. Adolescents became significantly more avoidant from in-hospital coping to one month postsurgery. Conclusions: Results show that adolescents who cope more vigilantly preoperatively (e.g., seek information, problem solve and rely on others) have better long term activity outcomes. Becoming more avoidant postoperatively could be attributed to the overwhelming stressors during recovery and discouragement over the progress of recovery. Implications: Adolescents undergoing major spinal surgery need interventions to enhance their coping during recovery. Nurses should prepare patients to anticipate a long and challenging recovery and provide supportive information at specific times during recovery to help patients cope more actively.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:29:24Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:29:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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