Results From the Formative Evaluation of Nursense, an Integrated Remote Home Monitoring Sensor and Internet Support System for Working Family Caregivers of Frail Elders

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153756
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Results From the Formative Evaluation of Nursense, an Integrated Remote Home Monitoring Sensor and Internet Support System for Working Family Caregivers of Frail Elders
Abstract:
Results From the Formative Evaluation of Nursense, an Integrated Remote Home Monitoring Sensor and Internet Support System for Working Family Caregivers of Frail Elders
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Mahoney, Diane, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Hebrew Rehabilitation Center for Aged
Title:Director of Gerontechnology, Senior Research Scientist, and Director of Nursing Research
Co-Authors:Barbara Tarlow, PhD, RN; Angela Goodridge, RN, BS
Objectives: To ascertain receptivity to a nursing informatic program that helps employees check on vulnerable elders at home during working hours via wireless technology linked to the workplace. To increase understanding about the barriers and facilitators to adoption of the technology. Design: 3 month Formative Evaluation of Nursense an automated sensor home monitoring and an Internet based family caregiver support program both accessed at the workplace; Sample: working family caregivers of frail elders recruited from New England, USA (n = 25); Conceptual model was based on Rogers’ adoption of technology model; Methods: Telephone semi-structured interviews of randomly chosen workers pre-site recruitment, eligible caregivers who requested discussion group participation but declined the home monitoring technology component, and all in the discussion group; Findings: Family refusal, not managerial concerns accounted for non-adoption. Relatives who refused were unanimously concerned that the monitoring would be intrusive. Perceived installation hassles also arose even though none of these families viewed the sensors or setup. Busyness at work was the prime reason for lack of discussion group usage and participants requested access outside of work time. Adoptees highly valued the independence enabled by the monitoring and suggestions from the discussion group. Business concerns of technology based time abuse did not occur. Conclusions: Educational outreach needs to extend beyond the caregiving dyad to include family members and directly address installation concerns and fears of interference with home routine. Subject testimonials, video demonstrations showing the equipment and ease of usage are necessary; Implications: Efforts needed, not only in technology development, but also in public education to offset negative perceptions of technology to enhance adoption by businesses, employees and their families. This project is funded by the US Dept of Commerce Technology Opportunity Program, 2002-04.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResults From the Formative Evaluation of Nursense, an Integrated Remote Home Monitoring Sensor and Internet Support System for Working Family Caregivers of Frail Eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153756-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Results From the Formative Evaluation of Nursense, an Integrated Remote Home Monitoring Sensor and Internet Support System for Working Family Caregivers of Frail Elders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mahoney, Diane, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Hebrew Rehabilitation Center for Aged</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Gerontechnology, Senior Research Scientist, and Director of Nursing Research</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mahoney@mail.hrca.harvard.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara Tarlow, PhD, RN; Angela Goodridge, RN, BS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: To ascertain receptivity to a nursing informatic program that helps employees check on vulnerable elders at home during working hours via wireless technology linked to the workplace. To increase understanding about the barriers and facilitators to adoption of the technology. Design: 3 month Formative Evaluation of Nursense an automated sensor home monitoring and an Internet based family caregiver support program both accessed at the workplace; Sample: working family caregivers of frail elders recruited from New England, USA (n = 25); Conceptual model was based on Rogers&rsquo; adoption of technology model; Methods: Telephone semi-structured interviews of randomly chosen workers pre-site recruitment, eligible caregivers who requested discussion group participation but declined the home monitoring technology component, and all in the discussion group; Findings: Family refusal, not managerial concerns accounted for non-adoption. Relatives who refused were unanimously concerned that the monitoring would be intrusive. Perceived installation hassles also arose even though none of these families viewed the sensors or setup. Busyness at work was the prime reason for lack of discussion group usage and participants requested access outside of work time. Adoptees highly valued the independence enabled by the monitoring and suggestions from the discussion group. Business concerns of technology based time abuse did not occur. Conclusions: Educational outreach needs to extend beyond the caregiving dyad to include family members and directly address installation concerns and fears of interference with home routine. Subject testimonials, video demonstrations showing the equipment and ease of usage are necessary; Implications: Efforts needed, not only in technology development, but also in public education to offset negative perceptions of technology to enhance adoption by businesses, employees and their families. This project is funded by the US Dept of Commerce Technology Opportunity Program, 2002-04.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:29:37Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:29:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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