Nurses, Their Hospital Work Environments, and Their Responses to These Environments

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153785
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses, Their Hospital Work Environments, and Their Responses to These Environments
Abstract:
Nurses, Their Hospital Work Environments, and Their Responses to These Environments
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Tourangeau, Ann, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Toronto
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: The purpose of this paper is to describe key findings of a survey sent to all registered nurses and licensed practical nurses working in teaching and community hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Design: This completed survey is the first phase of two studies examining nursing-related determinants of mortality and unplanned readmission for surgical and medical patients discharged from Ontario hospitals in 2002-2003. This survey is part of two large retrospective studies designed to test theory of the determinants of these two outcomes. This paper focuses on nurse survey results. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: In 2003, approximately 13,500 surveys were mailed to all registered nurses and licensed practical nurses working within medical, surgical, and critical care areas in all Ontario teaching and community hospitals. Response rate for this survey was 68%. Survey Content: Nurses were invited to complete a survey about employment information, career plans, quality of care provided to patients, sharp incidents, burnout, work environments, job satisfaction, patient processes of care, care delivery system used, and demographic characteristics. Methods: A modified Dillman method was used to manage survey implementation between January and May 2003. Data are being analyzed using a variety of descriptive and inferential techniques within SPSS Version 11.5. Findings: Analyses are currently underway with the final survey dataset. For this paper, nurse responses are grouped and compared according to category of nurse (registered nurse and licensed practical nurse) and area of employment (medical, surgical, and critical care). Relationships among key survey variables are explored (e.g., intent to stay in current job, degree of professional practice environment, burnout, etc). Conclusions and Implications: Study results illustrate the nature of current nurse work environments and nurse responses to these environments. How this knowledge will be used in further research and the second stage of the study will briefly be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses, Their Hospital Work Environments, and Their Responses to These Environmentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153785-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses, Their Hospital Work Environments, and Their Responses to These Environments</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tourangeau, Ann, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Toronto</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ann.tourangeau@utoronto.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this paper is to describe key findings of a survey sent to all registered nurses and licensed practical nurses working in teaching and community hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Design: This completed survey is the first phase of two studies examining nursing-related determinants of mortality and unplanned readmission for surgical and medical patients discharged from Ontario hospitals in 2002-2003. This survey is part of two large retrospective studies designed to test theory of the determinants of these two outcomes. This paper focuses on nurse survey results. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: In 2003, approximately 13,500 surveys were mailed to all registered nurses and licensed practical nurses working within medical, surgical, and critical care areas in all Ontario teaching and community hospitals. Response rate for this survey was 68%. Survey Content: Nurses were invited to complete a survey about employment information, career plans, quality of care provided to patients, sharp incidents, burnout, work environments, job satisfaction, patient processes of care, care delivery system used, and demographic characteristics. Methods: A modified Dillman method was used to manage survey implementation between January and May 2003. Data are being analyzed using a variety of descriptive and inferential techniques within SPSS Version 11.5. Findings: Analyses are currently underway with the final survey dataset. For this paper, nurse responses are grouped and compared according to category of nurse (registered nurse and licensed practical nurse) and area of employment (medical, surgical, and critical care). Relationships among key survey variables are explored (e.g., intent to stay in current job, degree of professional practice environment, burnout, etc). Conclusions and Implications: Study results illustrate the nature of current nurse work environments and nurse responses to these environments. How this knowledge will be used in further research and the second stage of the study will briefly be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:30:54Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:30:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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