Relationship of maternal responsiveness and infant temperament to infant-mother attachment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153846
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship of maternal responsiveness and infant temperament to infant-mother attachment
Abstract:
Relationship of maternal responsiveness and infant temperament to infant-mother attachment
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Coffman, Sherrilyn, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Sierra Health Services
Title:Nurse Practitioner
This study utilized the Strange Situation Procedure, the predominant paradigm used to measure attachment security in the infant, developed by Ainsworth and colleagues. The purpose of the study was to determine the relationships between maternal responsiveness, infant temperament, and attachment classifications. Previous studies in psychology suggest a consistent, measurable influence by the mother on the attachment relationship. Ainsworth further proposes that an infant's influence on the mother may be masked by maternal sensitivity.



The study sample included 49 mothers and their infants averaging 13 months of age. The Infant Characteristics Questionnaire by Bates was used to measure the mother's perception of her infant's temperament. Each woman brought this completed questionnaire to the laboratory facility, where she was videotaped with her infant in a teaching interaction to determine maternal responsiveness. Infants and mothers were also videotaped in a modified Strange Situation, following which infants were classified into three attachment groups (Group A: Anxious-Avoidant; Group B: Securely Attached; and Group C: Anxious-Ambivalent).



Infant temperament was found to be a better predictor of attachment than maternal responsiveness. Infant temperament differed significantly only between attachment groups A and B. Infants in Group A had less difficult temperaments than those in Group B; in other words, mothers of anxious-avoidant infants perceived their infants' temperaments to be easier than did mothers of securely attached infants.



Although maternal responsiveness in the home has been found to predict attachment, responsiveness as measured in a teaching situation in this study did not directly relate to infant attachment. Previous studies have found mothers of group A infants to be less responsive in the home. In this study, perhaps these mothers found their infants to be easier because they had failed to read the infant's signals for attention. Or perhaps temperament affects the form that individual differences take in infant attachment security classifications.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship of maternal responsiveness and infant temperament to infant-mother attachmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153846-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship of maternal responsiveness and infant temperament to infant-mother attachment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coffman, Sherrilyn, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Sierra Health Services</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">scoffman@sierrahealth.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study utilized the Strange Situation Procedure, the predominant paradigm used to measure attachment security in the infant, developed by Ainsworth and colleagues. The purpose of the study was to determine the relationships between maternal responsiveness, infant temperament, and attachment classifications. Previous studies in psychology suggest a consistent, measurable influence by the mother on the attachment relationship. Ainsworth further proposes that an infant's influence on the mother may be masked by maternal sensitivity.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The study sample included 49 mothers and their infants averaging 13 months of age. The Infant Characteristics Questionnaire by Bates was used to measure the mother's perception of her infant's temperament. Each woman brought this completed questionnaire to the laboratory facility, where she was videotaped with her infant in a teaching interaction to determine maternal responsiveness. Infants and mothers were also videotaped in a modified Strange Situation, following which infants were classified into three attachment groups (Group A: Anxious-Avoidant; Group B: Securely Attached; and Group C: Anxious-Ambivalent).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Infant temperament was found to be a better predictor of attachment than maternal responsiveness. Infant temperament differed significantly only between attachment groups A and B. Infants in Group A had less difficult temperaments than those in Group B; in other words, mothers of anxious-avoidant infants perceived their infants' temperaments to be easier than did mothers of securely attached infants.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Although maternal responsiveness in the home has been found to predict attachment, responsiveness as measured in a teaching situation in this study did not directly relate to infant attachment. Previous studies have found mothers of group A infants to be less responsive in the home. In this study, perhaps these mothers found their infants to be easier because they had failed to read the infant's signals for attention. Or perhaps temperament affects the form that individual differences take in infant attachment security classifications.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:33:33Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:33:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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