A prospective study documenting women's experiences combining breastfeeding and employment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153847
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A prospective study documenting women's experiences combining breastfeeding and employment
Abstract:
A prospective study documenting women's experiences combining breastfeeding and employment
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:May 19 - 22, 1992
Author:Hedstrom, Louise, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:North Park College
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing
Women in increasing numbers are returning to work shortly after

giving birth (O'Connell, 1989) while breastfeeding is being

recommended more strongly than ever (the American Academy of

Pediatrics, 1982; the Department of Health and Human Services, 1980

and 1990). Although more women are attempting to combine

breastfeeding and employment, breastfeeding rates have declined

slightly in the mid and late 1980s. Women's perceptions of their

experiences combining employment and breast feeding were explored

in this study based on the feminist concept of the importance of

analyzing the condition of women's lives from their own

perspectives. Themes of motivation, support, and obstacles

emerged.



Qualitative and quantitative data were collected using

semistructured interview guides in-person and by telephone with a

convenience sample of 42 women and a prospective, longitudinal

design. All interviews were tape-recorded, coded and analyzed with

a computer program for qualitative data.



Twenty-eight (67 percent) of the women combined breastfeeding and

employment for an average of nearly 15 weeks. Three patterns of

infant feeding emerged with significantly different mean durations

of breastfeeding. Qualitative data revealed obstacles of short

leaves, negative responses from others, inadequate facilities for

expressing milk at work, and lack of access to the baby during the

work day. The predominate motivation for breastfeeding was the

belief that it was best for baby. Tangible and emotional support

was primarily from husbands. The majority of the participants were

very positive about the experience despite acknowledging the

commitment required. Clinical application relates to needed

changes in the workplace, client teaching and empowerment, and is

of particular interest to occupational health and maternal-child

nurses.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
19-May-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA prospective study documenting women's experiences combining breastfeeding and employmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153847-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A prospective study documenting women's experiences combining breastfeeding and employment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">May 19 - 22, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hedstrom, Louise, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">North Park College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Women in increasing numbers are returning to work shortly after<br/><br/>giving birth (O'Connell, 1989) while breastfeeding is being<br/><br/>recommended more strongly than ever (the American Academy of<br/><br/>Pediatrics, 1982; the Department of Health and Human Services, 1980<br/><br/>and 1990). Although more women are attempting to combine<br/><br/>breastfeeding and employment, breastfeeding rates have declined<br/><br/>slightly in the mid and late 1980s. Women's perceptions of their<br/><br/>experiences combining employment and breast feeding were explored<br/><br/>in this study based on the feminist concept of the importance of<br/><br/>analyzing the condition of women's lives from their own<br/><br/>perspectives. Themes of motivation, support, and obstacles<br/><br/>emerged.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Qualitative and quantitative data were collected using<br/><br/>semistructured interview guides in-person and by telephone with a<br/><br/>convenience sample of 42 women and a prospective, longitudinal<br/><br/>design. All interviews were tape-recorded, coded and analyzed with<br/><br/>a computer program for qualitative data.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Twenty-eight (67 percent) of the women combined breastfeeding and<br/><br/>employment for an average of nearly 15 weeks. Three patterns of<br/><br/>infant feeding emerged with significantly different mean durations<br/><br/>of breastfeeding. Qualitative data revealed obstacles of short<br/><br/>leaves, negative responses from others, inadequate facilities for<br/><br/>expressing milk at work, and lack of access to the baby during the<br/><br/>work day. The predominate motivation for breastfeeding was the<br/><br/>belief that it was best for baby. Tangible and emotional support<br/><br/>was primarily from husbands. The majority of the participants were<br/><br/>very positive about the experience despite acknowledging the<br/><br/>commitment required. Clinical application relates to needed<br/><br/>changes in the workplace, client teaching and empowerment, and is<br/><br/>of particular interest to occupational health and maternal-child<br/><br/>nurses.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:33:35Z-
dc.date.issued1992-05-19en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:33:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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