The conflict of nurturing for women: Implications for self-esteem and depression

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153848
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The conflict of nurturing for women: Implications for self-esteem and depression
Abstract:
The conflict of nurturing for women: Implications for self-esteem and depression
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Duffy, Virginia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Rochester Medical Center
Title:Director NIV Clinic Psychiatry
This research explored the relationships between nurturance,

self-esteem, and depression in the lives of ten American women.

Nurturing behavior has been a societal expectation for women and

has been viewed by feminist scholars and others as an important

positive factor in the development of women's sense of self and

self-esteem (Gilligan, 1982; Miller, 1979, 1991). It is imperative

to understand self-esteem in women due to the strong relationship

between low self-esteem and depression (Beck, 1967). Women in our

society experience depression at rates two to three times higher

than men (Lipsitt, 1982; OMH News, 1990). Thus, the relationship

between gender and depression is a crucial area to be explored.



A qualitative study was conducted with 10 women participating in a

psychotherapy group who were experiencing low self-esteem and

depression. This study was approved by the Human Subjects Review

Board and appropriate consents were obtained from informants. The

constant comparative method of Grounded Theory (Chenitz and

Swanson, 1986) was used to analyze 90 minute audiotapes of 52

consecutive group sessions. The goal of this research was to

explore from the personal perspectives of these women, the

relationships between nurturance, self-esteem, and depression.



Data analysis revealed a conflict in the lives of these women. A

dark side of nurturing behavior emerged that gave evidence for this

conflict. That is, although nurturing of others occasionally

resulted in positive feelings, often it competed with personal

needs and resulted in diminished self-esteem and exacerbation of

depression. These women believed and accepted society's imperatives

to nurture. Data indicate that when these women's personal feelings

conflicted with societal demands to nurture, nurturing won out. In

such instances, nurturing behavior had a detrimental effect, often

leading to depression. Data revealed that for these women the sense

of being forced to choose nurturance over their own needs led to

silencing of self-expression, distrust of themselves, and

suppression of their self-awareness. Gilligan (1982) says that

women often speak in a different voice, a voice of nurturance.

For the women in this study, choosing nurturance over their own

needs led to decreased self-esteem and depression. Thus, a theory

of the conflict of nurturance emerged as one possible explanation

for the low self-esteem and depression experienced by these women.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe conflict of nurturing for women: Implications for self-esteem and depressionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153848-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The conflict of nurturing for women: Implications for self-esteem and depression</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Duffy, Virginia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Rochester Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director NIV Clinic Psychiatry</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vduffy@rochester.infi.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This research explored the relationships between nurturance,<br/><br/>self-esteem, and depression in the lives of ten American women.<br/><br/>Nurturing behavior has been a societal expectation for women and<br/><br/>has been viewed by feminist scholars and others as an important<br/><br/>positive factor in the development of women's sense of self and<br/><br/>self-esteem (Gilligan, 1982; Miller, 1979, 1991). It is imperative<br/><br/>to understand self-esteem in women due to the strong relationship<br/><br/>between low self-esteem and depression (Beck, 1967). Women in our<br/><br/>society experience depression at rates two to three times higher<br/><br/>than men (Lipsitt, 1982; OMH News, 1990). Thus, the relationship<br/><br/>between gender and depression is a crucial area to be explored.<br/><br/><br/><br/>A qualitative study was conducted with 10 women participating in a<br/><br/>psychotherapy group who were experiencing low self-esteem and<br/><br/>depression. This study was approved by the Human Subjects Review<br/><br/>Board and appropriate consents were obtained from informants. The<br/><br/>constant comparative method of Grounded Theory (Chenitz and<br/><br/>Swanson, 1986) was used to analyze 90 minute audiotapes of 52<br/><br/>consecutive group sessions. The goal of this research was to<br/><br/>explore from the personal perspectives of these women, the<br/><br/>relationships between nurturance, self-esteem, and depression.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Data analysis revealed a conflict in the lives of these women. A<br/><br/>dark side of nurturing behavior emerged that gave evidence for this<br/><br/>conflict. That is, although nurturing of others occasionally<br/><br/>resulted in positive feelings, often it competed with personal<br/><br/>needs and resulted in diminished self-esteem and exacerbation of<br/><br/>depression. These women believed and accepted society's imperatives<br/><br/>to nurture. Data indicate that when these women's personal feelings<br/><br/>conflicted with societal demands to nurture, nurturing won out. In<br/><br/>such instances, nurturing behavior had a detrimental effect, often<br/><br/>leading to depression. Data revealed that for these women the sense<br/><br/>of being forced to choose nurturance over their own needs led to<br/><br/>silencing of self-expression, distrust of themselves, and<br/><br/>suppression of their self-awareness. Gilligan (1982) says that<br/><br/>women often speak in a different voice, a voice of nurturance.<br/><br/>For the women in this study, choosing nurturance over their own<br/><br/>needs led to decreased self-esteem and depression. Thus, a theory<br/><br/>of the conflict of nurturance emerged as one possible explanation<br/><br/>for the low self-esteem and depression experienced by these women.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:33:37Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:33:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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